Russia: Tsarist and Communist

By Anatole G. Mazour | Go to book overview

34
The Soviet Union in World Affairs (1929-1939

FEAR OF ISOLATION AND AGGRESSION

AFTER THE Soviet setback in China, Stalin's triumph over Trotsky, and the adoption of the Five-Year Plan, the accent of Soviet foreign policy was on collective security abroad and military consolidation at home. But collective security was not to be so easily attained. So long as fear of the spread of Communism prevailed, even diplomatic recognition proved entirely inadequate. On various occasions diplomatic proprieties were thrown to the winds and a strong exchange of notes in a most undiplomatic style would serve as a reminder of the existing chasm. Winston Churchill considered the Kremlin government nothing less than a band of cosmopolitan conspirators gathered from the underground world', and 'the foul Baboonery of Bolshevism'. Lord Birkenhead called it a 'junta of assassins and thieves'. To the Communists, the Tories and other allied parties represented 'capitalistic exploiters, bloodthirsty imperialists and vampires sucking the blood of colonial peoples'. Hard words butter no turnips. The exchange of epithets removed no grievances, it added little to the good humor of either party, and galvanized enmity on both sides. The West was in constant dread of 'Red infiltration', as it kept alive memories of blockade, intervention, and support for the White armies. There was no assurance that this hostility had ceased with the end of the Civil War, the Kremlin argued.

Ever since the Communists ascended to power they have been haunted by fear of isolation and of a war against the Soviet Union by a combination of Western powers. Until the USSR could recover from civil strife, restore and improve her economy, and surpass the West at the West's own game, the country needed peace, no matter what the price. The Five-Year Plans and their economic aspirations were one expression of the desire to attain a maximum of security, and peace was necessary for the national reconstruction outlined by the Gosplan. Soviet diplomacy employed every device to assure an undisturbed existence; every move in the West was watched vigilantly, and whenever a conference gathered without Soviet participation, suspicion was intensified of imminent ill winds from the west.

It was for this reason, primarily, that the Soviet government, in accordance with the resolution of the Fifteenth Congress of the Communist Party, laid particular stress on strengthening the armed forces. More than

-711-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Russia: Tsarist and Communist
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 1000

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.