Buddhist Hagiographies in Early Japan: Images of Compassion in the Gyoki Tradition

By Jonathan Morris Augustine | Go to book overview

APPENDIX

A full translation of the most important histories and biographies that describe the achievements of Gyōki are listed here in chronological order.


1.

Shoku Nihongi biography of Gyōki (749, edited in 797)

On the second day of the second month in 749, the senior primary prelate, Gyōki, passed away. He had been a Buddhist monk of Yakushi temple. Gyōki originally was from Izumi Province and his surname before ordination had been Koshi. Gyōki was naturally endowed with virtue and wisdom, so when he studied the consciousness-only doctrine of the Yogācāra school, he immediately penetrated its content. Afterwards, he traveled around the province and instructed people about the teaching of the Buddha. More than one thousand monks and lay people followed him wherever he went. When people heard that Gyōki was going to be passing by, the streets became congested with people who hoped to get a glimpse of the Buddhist monk. Gyōki led each person to the path of enlightenment according to his or her capacity. He also took his disciples to various treacherous spots where they built dikes and bridges. Those who heard about Gyōki's activities joined him, so the facilities were completed in a very short time. The local farmers are benefiting from the facilities that Gyōki constructed to this very day.

Emperor Shōmu, who deeply revered Gyōki, issued and imperial edict to award him the title of senior primary prelate. Nine hundred monks were also ordained on this occasion. People called Gyōki “bodhisattva”, because of his miraculous powers.

Gyōki was constantly on the road, and wherever he stopped, he erected temples and practice halls. Within the inner provinces alone,

-125-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Buddhist Hagiographies in Early Japan: Images of Compassion in the Gyoki Tradition
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Introduction - The Bodhisattva Gyōki in the Broader Hagiographic Context 1
  • 1 - The Received Biography of GyŌki 13
  • 2 - The Bodhisattva Tradition and the Hagiographer's Craft 28
  • 3 - GyŌki and the SŌniryŌ 47
  • 4 - GyŌki and the Politics of the Nara Court 63
  • 5 - GyŌki's Charitable Projects 84
  • 6 - GyŌki and Further Developments in Buddhist Hagiography 97
  • Conclusion 118
  • Appendix 125
  • Glossary of Japanese Terms 142
  • Notes 146
  • Bibliography 159
  • Index 166
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 173

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.