Graduate Citizens? Issues of Citizenship and Higher Education

By John Ahier; John Beck et al. | Go to book overview

Notes

1

Citizenship in Britain: models and identities

1
The phrase is, of course, that of E. P. Thompson (1965).
2
This alerts us to the important point that many theoretically elaborated conceptions of citizenship are strongly normative: this applies equally to Marshallian and neo-liberal conceptions as well as to the work of political philosophers as diverse as Sandel, MacIntyre, John Rawls or John Gray. A properly sociological treatment and definition of citizenship, while not of course value-free, has the potential advantage of being able to relate such normative theories to their grounding in social, economic and political conditions.
3
This opens onto a large and contested terrain. David Miller, for example, who distinguishes three kinds of citizenship pertinent to the UK (liberal/Marshallian, citizens as consumers of public services, and active citizenship), argues: 'My own view concerning this matter is controversial. We cannot have active citizenship in the modern world, without inclusive national identities to support it.' He goes on to suggest that some form of 'nested citizenship' may emerge to contain a more flexible and inclusive understanding of nationality but adds: 'But at the same time, we must recognise that we cannot teach people to be citizens without teaching them to be members of a national community' (Miller 2000a: 31).
4
David Miller adumbrates a similar if more narrowly focused vision of 'the citizen as a consumer of public services who therefore has consumers' rights', and who is 'empowered to expect a certain standard of service or provision, and empowered to seek compensation or redress if the service is not satisfactory' (Miller 2000a: 28). Miller's primary interest, however, is in contrasting this citizen (who is recognised as 'active' but only in limited ways) with the more authentically 'active citizen' of the civic republican tradition, for example, as this term is interpreted by Bernard Crick (Crick 2000a: 8, 2000b: 6).
5
It is arguable that Rose's whole analysis of the reconstitution of citizenship under what he calls 'advanced liberalism' is perhaps too closed, too neat, too programmatic, constructed as it is from the standpoint of an attempt to persuade us that we are witnessing an

-181-

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Graduate Citizens? Issues of Citizenship and Higher Education
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • List of Abbreviations viii
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - Citizenship in Britain 7
  • Chapter 2 - Prospects for Social National Citizenship in the United Kingdom 35
  • Chapter 3 - Citizenship and the Restructuring of Higher Education 62
  • Chapter 4 - Citizenship Themes in Students' Lives 99
  • Chapter 5 - Citizenship, Mutuality and Civil Society 132
  • Chapter 6 - Conclusion 157
  • Appendix 172
  • Notes 181
  • Bibliography 186
  • Index 197
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