6

MAKING SPACE

Perspective Vision and the Real

THE LIVING

Culture, like life, is for the living, however, and if in the last instance all culture inscribes an acknowledgement of death, the lonely hour of the last instance can seem a long way off. What relevance might the psychoanalytic account of culture have for the living? Not surprisingly, perhaps, culture has many ways to recognize and disarm the drive. Among these, the reproduction of perspective vision in painting, and subsequently in writing, hollows out a space to accommodate desire. The flat picture plane miraculously comes to simulate three dimensions, conjures depth of field, introducing the illusion of vacancy into the continuity of the real. And in the course of time, illusionist fiction followed suit. We are now so surrounded by high-resolution photography and film that the miracle of fixed-point perspective is easily taken for granted, with the effect of rendering imperceptible its relation to unconscious desire. But photography simply completes a programme inaugurated six centuries ago and elaborated in detail since then. How does it work?

-81-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Culture and the Real
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations viii
  • General Editor's Preface ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgements xvi
  • 1 - What's Real? 1
  • 2 - Psychoanalysis Beyond Idealism 20
  • 3 - The Lacanian Real 38
  • 4 - ŽiŽek Against Lacan 52
  • 5 - Culture's Magic Circle 64
  • 6 - Making Space 81
  • 7 - Desire and the Missing Viewer 100
  • 8 - The Real and the Sublime 119
  • 9 - Sublime or Sublimation? 139
  • Further Reading 157
  • Notes 160
  • References 163
  • Index 169
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 172

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.