Fear: The History of a Political Idea

By Corey Robin | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I would like to thank the following friends, colleagues, teachers, and editors, who read and commented upon this manuscript, whether in draft, paper, or article form: Bruce Ackerman, Moustafa Bayoumi, Roger Boesche, Shelley Burtt, Josh Cohen, Peter Cole, Michael Denning, Jack Diggins, Tom Dumm, Sam Farber, Steve Fraser, Josh Freeman, Paul Frymer, Emily Gordon, Greg Grandin, Nancy Grey, Michael Hardt, Adina Hoffman, David Hughes, Judy Hughes, Allen Hunter, Victoria Kahn, Ariel Kaminer, Rebecca Karl, Scott James, David Johnston, Gordon Lafer, Jackson Lears, Chris Lehmann, Mark Levinson, Penny Lewis, Arien Mack, Ian Malcolm, Arno Mayer, David Mayhew, Kirstie McClure, John McCormick, John Medeiras, Laurie Muchnick, Sankar Muthu, Molly Nolan, Karen Orren, Christian Parenti, Kim Phillips Fein, Francis Fox Piven, Robert Potts, Mel Richter, Jessica Robin, Andy Sabl, Scott Saul, Jim Scott, Ellen Schrecker, Jenny Schuessler, Alex Star, Michelle Stephens, Laura Tanenbaum, Rob Tempio, Peter Terzian, Jeanne Theoharis, Roy Tsao, Michael Walzer, Kathi Weeks, Eve Weinbaum, Keith Whittington, Daniel Wilkinson, Richard Wolin, Brian Young, and Marilyn Young. Special thanks to Rogers Smith, my dissertation advisor, to Tim Bartlett, my editor at Oxford University Press, and to Barbara Fillon, Peter Harper, and Catherine Humphries at Oxford University Press. Generous funding for the completion of this project was provided by the International Center for Advanced Studies of New York University; the Wolfe Institute for the Humanities at Brooklyn College; the Professional Staff Congress of the City University of New York; and the Center for Place, Culture, and Politics at the Graduate

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Fear: The History of a Political Idea
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Fear - The History of a Political Idea *
  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Fear xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Part 1 - History of an Idea 27
  • 1 - Fear 31
  • 2 - Terror 51
  • 3 - Anxiety 73
  • 4 - Total Terror 95
  • 5 - Remains of the Day 131
  • Part 2 - Fear, American Style 161
  • 6 - Sentimental Educations 167
  • 7 - Divisions of Labor 199
  • 8 - Upstairs, Downstairs 227
  • Conclusion: Liberalism Agonistes 249
  • Notes 253
  • Index 303
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