Developmental Language Disorders: From Phenotypes to Etiologies

By Mabel L. Rice; Steven F. Warren | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This research was supported by Grant No. HD29957 from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and Grant No. NS35102 from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. I thank all of the participants and their families. I am grateful to the geneticists, cardiologists, and early intervention agencies who referred individuals with Williams syndrome or other developmental disorders to our research, as well as to Terry Monkaba, executive director of the National Williams Syndrome Association, who has encouraged and facilitated the conduct of research at regional and national meetings of the Williams Syndrome Association. I would like to thank Melissa Rowe, Angela Becerra, Jacquelyn Bertrand, and Sharon Armstrong for data collection and analysis; Joanie Robertson for database management and figure creation; and Byron Robinson and Bonnie Klein-Tasman for discussions regarding many of the methodological issues discussed in this chapter. Portions of this chapter are based on Mervis and Robinson (2003) and Mervis and Klein-Tasman (in press).


References

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