Stress, Workload, and Fatigue

By Peter A. Hancock; Paula A. Desmond | Go to book overview

too qualitative. Work shift usability testing is not a radical new approach for ergonomic professionals. Workware is an approach to the issues of fatigue and stress, which attempts to avoid the stigma of using these old labels. It communicates methods more than concepts. In this approach, acceptable work shifts are viewed as the product of a design process in which alternative designs are considered, selected, and then evaluated.

Workware and more specifically the work shift usability testing approach emphasize the importance of developing reliable and valid work schedule design methodologies, rather than searching for a simple singular way to measure a complex process. These approaches recognize the value of a systems approach, quantitative methodology, and consideration of alternative solutions. Stress and fatigue are terms that are sometimes helpful in colloquial use. However, their true value as problem-solving constructs remains to be demonstrated. For the present, their use in the study, design, and evaluation of work systems should be avoided whenever possible.


References

Broadbent, D. E. (1979). Is a fatigue test now possible? Ergonomics, 22, 1277–1290.

Cohen, F. (1985). Stress and bodily illness. In A. Monat & R. S. Lazarus (Eds.), Stress and coping, an anthology (pp. 40–54). New York: Columbia University Press.

Cohen, S., Kessler, R. C., & Gordon, L. U. (1995). Measuring stress. New York: Oxford University Press.

Davies, D. R., Shackleton, V. J., & Parasuraman, R. (1983). Monotony and boredom. In G. R. J. Hockey (Ed.), Stress and fatigue in human performance (pp. 1–34). New York: Wiley.

Edwards, J. R. (1988). The determinants and consequences of coping with stress. In C. L. Cooper & R. Payne (Eds.), Causing, coping and consequences of stress at work (pp. 233–263). New York: Wiley.

Fletcher, B. (1988). The epidemiology of occupational stress. In C. L. Cooper & R. Payne (Eds.), Causing, coping and consequences of stress at work. New York: Wiley.

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Frankenhauser, M. (1986). A psychobiological framework for research on human stress and coping. In M. H. Appley & R. Trumbull (Eds.), Dynamics of stress: Physiological, psychological and social perspectives (pp. 101–116). New York: Plenum.

Froberg, J. E. (1997). Twenty-four-hour patterns in human performance, subjective and physiological variables and differences between morning and evening active subjects. Biological Psychology, 5, 119–134.

Froberg, J. E., Karlsson, C. G., Lennart, L., and Lidberg, L. (1975). Circadian rhythms of catecholamine excretion, shooting range performance and self-ratings of fatigue during sleep deprivation. Biological Psychology, 2, 175–188.

Gersten, A. H. (1987). Adaptation in rotating shift workers: A six year follow-up study. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago.

Grandjean, E. (1968). Fatigue: Its physiological and psychological significance. Ergonomics, 11, 427–436.

Grippa, A. J., & Durbin, D. (1986). Workers' compensation occupational disease claims. National Council on Compensation Insurance Digest, 1 (2), 15–23.

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