Truman and Korea: The Political Culture of the Early Cold War

By Paul G. Pierpaoli Jr. | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

A few brief words here can hardly convey the full depth of my gratitude to the many people and institutions who made this book possible. Nonetheless, I offer my sincerest thanks to all who have helped me over the last several years. Although I sense that they know how important they have been to me, my gratitude knows no bounds. At the Ohio State University, where I began my intellectual odyssey as a professional historian, I wish to thank the following mentors and friends: Michael J. Hogan, William R. Childs, Allan R. Millett, Susan M. Hartmann, Albert J. Churella, and Marianne Holdzkom. Their insights and friendship sustained me and kept this project on track. Financial support from various institutions was also integral to the conclusion of this work, and thus I express my deepest appreciation to: the Ohio State University Alumni Association for its Graduate Research Award; the Harry S. Truman Library Institute for its very generous Dissertation Year Fellowship; and the Department of History at the University of Arizona for its financial support. I also wish to thank my colleagues at the University of Arizona for their patience and collegiality, and I want to especially thank my Department Chair Helen Nader for her unwavering support and encouragement.

The knowledgeable and helpful staffs at the National Archives and the Harry S. Truman Library proved indispensable to my research. I am indebted to them, especially William Creech at the National Archives and Erwin Mueller, Dennis Bilger, and Elizabeth Safly at the Truman Library. I also wish to thank Ruth Dickstein in the Social Sciences/History Division of the University of Arizona Main Library—her expertise and patience made the last leg of this work far more pleasant than it otherwise would have been.

In addition, I offer my steadfast gratitude to my old friend and mentor Alan F. Farrell, who long ago taught me that rigorous thinking, good writing, and unyielding academic integrity are worth fighting for. Further, I am indebted to my old friend Father Joseph H. Metzger Jr., who kept me on an even keel during a storm-tossed period in my

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