Truman and Korea: The Political Culture of the Early Cold War

By Paul G. Pierpaoli Jr. | Go to book overview

V

Crises of Confidence The Steel Crisis, Congressional Intransigence, and the Evolution of National Security, January—June 1952

Nineteen fifty-two dawned under a pall of uncertainty and frustration. The Korean War, stalemated for many months, dragged on with no end in sight. The president's approval rating stood at an all-time low of 23 percent. Mobilization officials still faced a barrage of criticism for their decision to stretch out the rearmament program. The nation continued to hold its breath as the Wage Stabilization Board worked furiously to avoid a strike of some 600,000 unionized steel workers. And, most disturbing to the Truman administration, its number-one military man and war hero General Dwight D. Eisenhower announced in early January that he was willing to accept the Republican party's presidential nomination. Eisenhower's announcement sent an unambiguous signal to his boss and his party: The Republicans were poised to make Korea the central theme in their efforts to dislodge twenty years of Democratic dominance in Washington. 1.

The first half of 1952 was dominated by the steel crisis, the ramifications of which were monumental. Unable to bring the nation's steel companies and their unionized employees together, Truman authorized the seizure of the companies to avert a stoppage in steel production. For nearly two months the government ran the steel mills. In June, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled the seizure unconstitutional, handing Truman a crushing defeat while at the same time establishing an historic

____________________
1.
For statistics and analyses of Truman's approval ratings and public sentiment toward the Korean War see John E. Mueller, War, Presidents, and Public Opinion; Ronald J. Caridi, The Korean War and American Politics: The Republican Party as a Case Study; and George H. Gallup, The Gallup Poll: Public Opinion 1935—1971, three volumes. The figure used in this paragraph was provided by the Gallup Poll as quoted in Newsweek 39 (January 7, 1952): 13.

-160-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Truman and Korea: The Political Culture of the Early Cold War
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 261

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.