Inside Yahoo! Reinvention and the Road Ahead

By Karen Angel | Go to book overview

Preface

Faced with the prospect of showing up every day at a small desk and laboriously manufacturing a lengthy document with hundreds of footnotes, the human spirit seems to gravitate toward other distractions.” 1 That's how Jerry Yang and David Filo explain the origins of the “distraction” from finishing their electrical engineering Ph.D.s that turned into a $130 billion company at its height and a wildly popular Web directory right from the start. “Part of their success was due to the intensity with which they tracked down Web pages, and part of it was due to their timing, ” 2 they admit in Yahoo! Unplugged (IDG Books, 1995), coyly referring to themselves in the third person.

Like Yang and Filo, I know all about laborious manufacturing and lengthy documents, but for me there was no escape hatch. My book is the story of the Internet symbol that sprang from a trailer on Stanford University's campus and the brains of two tech talents, an extrovert from Taiwan and an introvert from Moss Bluff, Louisiana. But it's the story of Yahoo with one big difference: Unlike other such accounts, mine is informed by key players who have rarely or never been heard from before— among them, the interim-management team that got Yahoo up and running and was later relegated to invisibility by the company's principals, the Reuters exec whose investment gave him a plum vantage point on Yahoo's board of directors, a manager who headed e-commerce and Yahoo Finance business develoment

-v-

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Inside Yahoo! Reinvention and the Road Ahead
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Preface v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents ix
  • Inside Yahoo! *
  • Chapter 1 - Stanford, 1994 1
  • Chapter 2 - Pioneer Way, 1995 21
  • Chapter 3 - Sunnyvale, 1996 47
  • Chapter 4 - Santa Clara, 1997 77
  • Chapter 5 - Staying Put and Scaling Up, 1998 101
  • Chapter 6 - The Portal Wars, 1996 to 1998 121
  • Chapter 7 - The Euphoria, 1999 147
  • Chapter 8 - The Unraveling, 2000 171
  • Chapter 9 - The Turmoil, 2001 203
  • Chapter 10 - The Semel Era 225
  • Notes 253
  • Index 265
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