Customize the Brand: Make It More Desirable and Profitable

By Torsten H. Nilson | Go to book overview

18
A better bottom line

Customizing a brand will bring in more sales and profits unless the costs for the customization process get out of hand. In this chapter we will explore why sales will increase and indicate a few issues relating to operational efficiencies.


MAKING MONEY FROM CUSTOMIZED BRANDING

Profits are necessary for a business to survive. They provide cash for development and a security blanket against future uncertainty. Employees of a profitable company are as a rule much happier and more efficient than those in struggling companies. The level of profit is a tangible piece of evidence of a company's success. Consequently, any marketing concept, and any part of marketing, must be judged against its ability to influence profits positively, in the short and long term.

Marketing costs are sometimes termed investments, which they are. Spending money on advertising, product development or a better customer database is an investment to generate future earnings. Sometimes the return is quick, sometimes it takes time. This can cause problems in companies with a short-term focus as marketing costs almost always are considered in accounting terms to be expenses, not investments.

The financial 'requirement' for immediate return is a problem with many traditional marketing expenses; with customized branding this problem can become much bigger. The reality is that it takes time for investments in the infrastructure to manage

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