The Routledgefalmer Reader in Higher Education

By Malcolm Tight | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 7

GRADUATE EMPLOYMENT AND WORK IN SELECTED EUROPEAN COUNTRIES

Ulrich Teichler

European Journal of Education, 35, 2, 141−156, 2000


EDITOR'S INTRODUCTION

This article stems from a project funded by the European Commission, and examines the quality of the available international statistics on graduate employment in nine western European countries. It comments on the difficulties of comparative analyses, the usefulness of surveys of this kind, and what might be done to improve matters in the future.

As a piece of research, the article offers an evaluation of two sets of secondary data, the term social scientists commonly use to refer to previously collected information that they haven't gathered themselves. Teichler focuses in particular on two existing data sets published each year: that compiled by EURYDICE, the European Commission agency responsible for collecting educational data, and that compiled by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).

The key statistics examined include: enrolment rates in higher education, the proportion of graduates in their age group, the percentage of adults who have completed higher education, and the variations in these statistics in terms of age, gender and field of study. Teichler then goes on to look at key employment statistics, including unemployment and labour force participation rates, and the relative earnings of those who have completed higher education.

Throughout his analysis, Teichler points out problems with the available data and their interpretation: varying definitions of what it means to be a student, differences in the age group typically in initial full-time higher education, what is and is not included within higher education in different countries. In the final third of the article, he goes on to consider some more generic issues, including the relevance of the graduation rate in an era of mass higher education, and recent graduate employment problems. He ends the article with some suggestions for improving international, and particularly European, higher education statistics.

This article was categorised in the introductory chapter as adopting a comparative approach to researching the student experience. The facet of the student experience being considered is primarily its outcome: what students do after they have finished being students.

The main literature to which this article relates is that substantial body of work dealing with the relation between the worlds of higher education and work. In recent years, Teichler and his colleagues have been responsible for a significant amount of research and publication in this area themselves (e.g. Maiworm and Teichler 1996, Teichler 1999a, 1999b, 2000, Teichler and Maiworm 1994), though others, of course, have contributed as well (e.g. Brennan et al. 1993, Egerton 2001a, 2001b, Harvey 2000). Two other literatures of interest here are those which deal with making the higher education experience more relevant

-108-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Routledgefalmer Reader in Higher Education
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 319

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.