Trouble-Shooting Your Teaching: A Step-By-Step Guide to Analysing and Improving Your Practice

By Geoffrey Squires | Go to book overview

3

Managing it all

Introduction

At first sight, it may seem strange to have a chapter on management in a book about teaching, and if you see yourself primarily as a lecturer or teacher you may assume that it does not apply to you. However, there are good reasons for including such a chapter and for reading it.

Management is a relatively new concept in education. In the past, there was teaching and there was administration. The former comprised curriculum and pedagogy; the purpose of the latter was to underpin them both in as smooth and unobtrusive a way as possible. The arrival of 'management' in education reflects the more general spread of the topic, which now reaches into every nook and cranny of public and private life. Not only do we manage commercial enterprises and public services but our own health, finances, relationships and even emotions. In this broad sense, management exists wherever there are complex choices and decisions to be made.

There are also particular reasons for its penetration of education. Whereas in the past courses and programmes could be relatively stable for long periods, now they seem to be in a continual state of change. Patterns of assessment and the structure of qualifications are regularly modified. Teaching itself keeps changing, partly because of the impact of new technology. All this development has to be managed. Then there is the growing emphasis on accountability and value for money; no longer is the curriculum a 'secret garden', the jealously guarded preserve of professional expertise. The individual autonomy of the lecturer or teacher has been modified by the need to work in teams, and qualified by reference to external bodies and stakeholders. The baronial and sometimes arbitrary powers that heads of departments and institutions often had in the past are now subject to democratic or consultative processes. Students are seen less as objects of instruction, more as partners in learning. In short, we can no longer look at teaching in isolation.

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Trouble-Shooting Your Teaching: A Step-By-Step Guide to Analysing and Improving Your Practice
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents iii
  • Acknowledgements v
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Trouble-Shooting the Session 10
  • 2 - Trouble-Shooting the Course 68
  • 3 - Managing It All 136
  • Appendix 1 186
  • Appendix 2 191
  • Appendix 3 193
  • Appendix 4 195
  • Further Reading 197
  • Notes 199
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