Trouble-Shooting Your Teaching: A Step-By-Step Guide to Analysing and Improving Your Practice

By Geoffrey Squires | Go to book overview

Appendix 1

What's going on?
The list of questions in Chapter 1 allows you to pinpoint certain aspects of your classroom teaching and to see whether they are working as well as you would wish. This is helpful in identifying and trying to deal with particular problems. However, if you want simply to explore your teaching and get a general picture of what is going on in a session, you can use the framework set out in this appendix. This activity is best done in pairs, so that you observe a colleague's teaching first and then your colleague observes yours. That allows you both to build up a mutual understanding of the process, and will almost certainly throw up contrasting issues, though you should eventually draw other people into the process as well so that it becomes a wider, collegial one. The person who is going to observe the class first needs to familiarize himself or herself with the framework, but it is not necessary to brief the teacher who is being observed. Indeed, it is better to let him or her proceed as normally as possible and to minimize any intrusion. The observer will need to be able to see and hear what is going on easily and record it on the form overleaf (a one-hour class may take several pages).Let us assume that you are doing the observing. In the left-hand column note down the time about every five minutes. This will be useful afterwards in reconstructing the sequence of events, but need not be rigid. In the next column, note down briefly the topic or subject matter at that time. This will again help you and the teacher to reconstruct afterwards what went on in the class, and relate the analysis of teaching to the content. In the third column, try to record what function the teacher (and perhaps students) was performing at that time, as follows:
Functions
Audit: identifying prior knowledge, skills or experience.
Orient: establishing direction, objectives or agenda.
Input: communicating or generating information (facts, ideas, practices).

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Trouble-Shooting Your Teaching: A Step-By-Step Guide to Analysing and Improving Your Practice
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents iii
  • Acknowledgements v
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Trouble-Shooting the Session 10
  • 2 - Trouble-Shooting the Course 68
  • 3 - Managing It All 136
  • Appendix 1 186
  • Appendix 2 191
  • Appendix 3 193
  • Appendix 4 195
  • Further Reading 197
  • Notes 199
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