Trouble-Shooting Your Teaching: A Step-By-Step Guide to Analysing and Improving Your Practice

By Geoffrey Squires | Go to book overview

Appendix 3

Guidelines for workshop leaders
You can use your own judgement and common sense in the way you employ this book in workshops or other structured staff development activities, but the following notes may be useful. There are two general points to bear in mind. First, the content of the workshop will depend on the role and position staff occupy in the institution, and this will suggest which chapter or chapters to use with them (perhaps refer back to Figure 0.1). Second, you should provide enough structure but not too much; the success of the workshop will depend on how well participants can use the framework that the book provides to come up with their own examples, diagnoses and solutions. Avoid too much presentation/input; leave plenty of time for group work. There are a number of more specific points:
• There is a lot in the book. Do not try to cover too much at one go; allow ample time for staff to contribute their own views and perspectives. A chapter can easily occupy half a day, and it is better and more satisfying to do a little in depth than a lot superficially.
• Apart from asking people to think about their teaching problems/ concerns in advance, it is probably best to have them come fresh to the workshop, without doing any prior reading. If you do want them to prepare beforehand, they can work through a few sections on their own (eg, 1-6).
• You can ask participants to begin by working individually through the diagnostic parts of each chapter, then collate their profiles and see what pattern (if any) emerges. Participants can then work in small groups on possible solutions, with a plenary for everyone to report back.
• Try to build some 'thinking time' into the process, either within or (ideally) between workshops.
• Certain sections (eg, on intake, assessment and evaluation) may be more topical at certain times of year, and meet immediate needs.

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Trouble-Shooting Your Teaching: A Step-By-Step Guide to Analysing and Improving Your Practice
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents iii
  • Acknowledgements v
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Trouble-Shooting the Session 10
  • 2 - Trouble-Shooting the Course 68
  • 3 - Managing It All 136
  • Appendix 1 186
  • Appendix 2 191
  • Appendix 3 193
  • Appendix 4 195
  • Further Reading 197
  • Notes 199
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