Trouble-Shooting Your Teaching: A Step-By-Step Guide to Analysing and Improving Your Practice

By Geoffrey Squires | Go to book overview

Notes

The following notes relate to points that are not covered in the references in the publications listed above. Since this is intended to be a mainly practical book, they have been kept to a minimum and restricted where possible to a few general sources.

Page

11

See Squires, G (1999) Teaching as a Professional Discipline, RoutledgeFalmer, London, pp 75-93.

12

The point was made many years ago by Robert Gagne in The Conditions of Learning (1969), Holt, Rinehart and Winston, London, pp 59-61. For a more recent discussion of different types of learning, see Jarvis, P, Holford , J and Griffin, C (2001) The Theory and Practice of Learning, Kogan Page, London.

18

Most general textbooks on educational psychology have something on the Pygmalion effect or teacher expectations; see for example Biehler, R F and Snowman, J (1993) Psychology Applied to Teaching, 7th edn, Houghton Mifflin, Boston, pp 568-72, or Child, D (1997) Psychology and the Teacher, 6th edn, Continuum, London, pp 71-72.

20

The specific reference here is to some previous research by the author: Gear, J, McIntosh, A and Squires, G (1994) Informal Learning in the Professions: Final research report, University of Hull Institute for Learning, Hull.

21

The best known is also one of the oldest: Bloom, B S et al (1956) Taxonomy of Educational Objectives, Longman, London.

21

There is a detailed discussion of the hidden curriculum in Meighan, R and Siraj-Blatchford, I (2000) A Sociology of Educating, 3rd edn, Continuum, London.

22

The formulation of key, generic or transferable skills varies from one sector to another, so you will need to consult the relevant literature for sixth forms, further education, or higher education. However, a useful general book is Assiter, A (ed) (1995) Transferable Skills

-199-

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Trouble-Shooting Your Teaching: A Step-By-Step Guide to Analysing and Improving Your Practice
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents iii
  • Acknowledgements v
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Trouble-Shooting the Session 10
  • 2 - Trouble-Shooting the Course 68
  • 3 - Managing It All 136
  • Appendix 1 186
  • Appendix 2 191
  • Appendix 3 193
  • Appendix 4 195
  • Further Reading 197
  • Notes 199
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