Special Teaching in Higher Education: Successful Strategies for Access and Inclusion

By Stuart Powell | Go to book overview

Preface

The education system in the UK has focused increasingly on provision of a 'curriculum for all'. Certainly in the school-age sector, access to education is clearly established as an entitlement for all individuals, and increasingly it is deemed appropriate that that education should be delivered within the mainstream context. Whatever the success of particular policies and procedures in these respects, it is clear that students are now gaining access to education where in the recent past they would have been excluded. In some areas (such as hearing impairment) ideological and methodological advances have been aided by technological advances (like the use of 'phonic ear' systems). In short, the potential of many students is now being realized to a greater extent than ever before. This phenomenon has progressed naturally from the school sector into FE and now HE.

This book addresses the learning needs of students within identified populations, and suggests effective responses of the staff in designing and delivering the curriculum. It offers discussion of teaching strategies that provide flexibility with regard to distinctive modes of learning, with individual chapters offering insights into how individuals may learn in special ways. Contributing authors cover the whole of the student experience, thus including social dimensions along with issues of academic learning.

Underpinning the book is the notion that higher education requires a level of critical thinking on the part of all students, and that there is therefore a need for all concerned to look beyond any particular disability or difficulty to the potential of students to learn to think with clarity and critical awareness within their chosen discipline. The text offers an analysis of the relationship between learning and teaching within HE, and the particular learning needs of some students. In this sense it examines the pedagogy of HE from particular perspectives within it. At the end of each of the parts of the book dealing with direct teaching, themes and issues are drawn together in short chapters.

-xiii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Special Teaching in Higher Education: Successful Strategies for Access and Inclusion
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 224

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.