The Effects of War on the Environment: Croatia

By Mervyn Richardson | Go to book overview

3

Remediation

Mervyn Richardson


3.1INTRODUCTION

The damage caused by the war to the chemical industry in Croatia as outlined in other chapters of this book is considerable.

However, the situation may well not be so bleak as in some of the other central and eastern European countries whose economic prospects may not be so advantageous.

Having seen at first hand the situation in some of these countries, e.g. the Ukraine, it is foreseen that provided that Croatia embarks on a structural scheme of remediation followed by reconstruction, she should recover from the ravages of warfare. For example, in addition to the gross pollution caused by continuing use of pesticides on the United Nations banned and severely restricted list, there is severe pollution in manufacturing industry in the area north of Kiev where there remains residues of radionuclides resulting from the Chernobyl disaster together with residues of lead volatilized during the fire. All of these adverse effects are incurring chronic health effects on the population who are additionally suffering from stress, limitations in diet, and an acute energy shortage. The Ukraine, whilst able to generate electricity using nuclear power and some hydroelectric power, only has poor quality deep mined coal, coupled with no known sources of gas and oil, which have to be imported. These imports are almost solely dependent on export of agricultural produce, largely cereals or root crops. Croatia on the other hand is fortunate in having good gas and oil reserves, a former industrial manufacturing base, world known agricultural products (largely wine and processed dairy and meat products) and above all a significant tourist industry.

Most of the countries in the former Soviet Union and its satellite states are suffering from an industrial infrastructure which was geared to a non-market economy, and furthermore, their industrial equipment is old,

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