Black Sexual Politics: African Americans, Gender, and the New Racism

By Patricia Hill Collins | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I begin by thanking students from the University of Cincinnati for their support of this project. Special thanks go to the students who enrolled in “Seminar in Black Sexual Politics” and in “Introduction to Black Gender Studies, ” two new courses in which I explored many of the ideas in this book. The issues in their lives convinced me of the need for this book. Undergraduate students also greatly helped my thinking about contemporary hip-hop culture. Several University of Cincinnati undergraduate student majors and minors in African American Studies assisted me as student researchers on various parts of this project. Adetra “Quay” Martin and Tanya Walker helped me to complete research on films and popular culture. Special thanks also go to Eric Styles, Kyle Riddle, Terri Holland, Erin Ledingham, Keith Melson, Khalila Sanders, and Torrie Wiggins for their insights.

Graduate students in Women's Studies and Sociology also provided important help. Valerie Ruffin made invaluable contributions to this project, both as my research assistant when she was a student at the University of Cincinnati and as a keen editorial eye concerning early drafts of this project. Special thanks also go to Stephen Whittaker for his thorough research in the literature of masculinities and for reading early drafts of some of the chapters. Jennifer Gossett, Sarah Byrne, and Jamie McCauley also shared ideas that improved the final quality of this manuscript. Vallarie Henderson and Tamika Odum assisted me with final manuscript preparation.

My University of Cincinnati colleagues also provided much-needed support for this project. I want to thank Patrice L. Dickerson for assistance with demographic material and

-vii-

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Black Sexual Politics: African Americans, Gender, and the New Racism
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Part I - African Americans and the New Racism 23
  • One - Why Black Sexual Politics? 25
  • Two - The Past is Ever Present 53
  • Three - Prisons for Our Bodies, Closets for Our Minds 87
  • Part II - Rethinking Black Gender Ideology 117
  • Four - Get Your Freak On 119
  • Five - Booty Call 149
  • Six - Very Necessary 181
  • Part III - Toward a Progressive Black Sexual Politics 213
  • Seven - Assume the Position 215
  • Eight - No Storybook Romance 247
  • Nine - Why We Can't Wait 279
  • Notes 309
  • Glossary 349
  • Bibliography 353
  • Index 367
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