Knut Wicksell on Poverty: No Place Is Too Exalted

By Mats Lundahl | Go to book overview

Notes

1

Introduction

1
See, however, Boianovsky (2001:142, note 17).
2
See also the list in Hashimoto (2001).
3
Emphasis added.

2

Tumultuous beginnings: the cause of poverty and its remedy

1
Gårdlund (1996:46) reports that it is impossible to discover who translated Drysdale's book into Swedish. This issue does not appear in half a century of correspondence between Wicksell and Öhrvall. Hence they would not know (Gårdlund, 1990:380).
2
Wicksell's own translation reads 'Some words about the principal causes and remedies of social evils intemperance especially noticed' (Hashimoto, 1996:34).
3
Myrdal and Myrdal (1935:37-48) provides a good summary of the criticism.
4
For information about Davidson, see Uhr (1975; 1991b).
5
Boströmianism was a specific, original, Swedish school, founded by Christopher Jacob Boström (1797-1866), which dominated the philosophical scene in the country during the later half of the nineteenth century. The school contended that to every human being on earth corresponded an eternal idea in a hierarchy with God at the top, encompassing all these ideas. It was politically conservative but radical in religious matters. Boströmianism gradually died out after the turn of the century. For an account, see Nordin (1981).
6
This passage is not included in the English translation in Gårdlund (1996).
7
Wicksell (1882).

3

The causes of population growth: the French prize essay

1
This essay only exists in a version written by hand by Wicksell's wife, Anna Bugge, which is the version of the Académie des sciences morales et politiques de I'Institut de France. A draft version in Wicksell's own handwriting is in the Wicksell archive at the University Library at Lund University. I am indebted to Hitoshi Hashimoto, who, with Michel Robine, is in the process of editing Wicksell's prize essay for publication, for generously providing me with a transcription of this document.

-105-

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Knut Wicksell on Poverty: No Place Is Too Exalted
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ix
  • Contents xiii
  • Preface xv
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - Tumultuous Beginnings 8
  • 3 - The Causes of Population Growth 23
  • 4 - The Centerpiece of Wicksell's Theory 30
  • 5 - Overpopulation, Specialization, and Trade 39
  • 6 - Emigration 50
  • 7 - The Optimum Population 59
  • 8 - Wicksell's Views 69
  • 9 - Why Was Wicksell Accused of Lack of Originality? 86
  • Notes 105
  • References 109
  • Index 117
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