Visual Perception: An Introduction

By Nicholas J. Wade; Michael T. Swanston | Go to book overview

of particular concern. Clearly, we would argue that this is not a strategy likely to lead to a balanced perspective on modern achievements, but if time is short this may be a sensible strategy. Chapters 1, 4, 5, and 6 are the core of the book, and these constitute a minimal selection. Our experience, no doubt shared by others, is that students will probably be drawn to read just those chapters that they have been told to omit, and that this often leads to the most useful subsequent discussion. We have tried throughout the book to reflect the intrinsic fascination of the subject matter, and its relevance for everyday activity and experience. Although there are many illustrations, there are very few of the pedagogical devices of modern textbooks, such as discussion boxes, quizzes, and the like. We have eschewed these for the sake of narrative continuity and because we are unsure of their real worth. We hope that the book will demand effort to achieve understanding. This effort will be repaid if it facilitates analysis and discussion in the tutorial setting and a desire to learn more about vision.

We are grateful to a number of people for helpful comments on the first edition, and to the very careful and thoughtful readers of a draft of this second edition, including Johan Wagemans, John Harris, Tom Troscianko, and Iain Gilchrist. Any errors and infelicities that remain are of course our own responsibility, but they are certainly fewer than would otherwise have been the case. Our families have continued to show the unqualified support and tolerance of our collaboration on this and other endeavours that has made the work possible, and we are glad to have this opportunity to say how grateful we are.

Nicholas J. Wade and Michael T. Swanston

Dundee

-xii-

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Visual Perception: An Introduction
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface to First Edition ix
  • Preface to Second Edition xi
  • 1 - Understanding Visual Perception 1
  • 2 - The Heritage 32
  • 3 - Light and the Eye 85
  • 4 - Location 143
  • 5 - Motion 178
  • 6 - Recognition 215
  • 7 - Representations and Vision 236
  • 8 - Summary and Conclusions 259
  • References 267
  • Name Index 277
  • Subject Index 281
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