Education Development and Leadership in Higher Education: Developing an Effective Institutional Strategy

By Kym Fraser | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

In January 2001 I met with my colleagues Peter Ling and Alex Radloff in a wonderful coffee bar in south-east Melbourne to discuss the idea of developing this book. It's been a long road to its fruition and I wish in particular to thank them both for their enthusiasm and support in nurturing and developing the ideas that underpin this book.

I have been fortunate in my career to have developed excellent 'collegial' relationships with a significant number of individuals from whom and with whom I have learnt a great deal about our profession and our discipline. 'Collegial' is the overwhelming sense that I have of these individuals and I am grateful for their friendship, sense of fun and thoughtfulness.

Thank you to my co-authors for their unfailing support, good humour and willingness to respond to my increasingly long and sometimes frantic email messages. Without you, this book wouldn't exist.

I am grateful for the efforts of Stephen Jones and James Wisdom in bringing this book to publication.

Alec, I have known and loved you for all of my life. You always had faith in me and for that, your friendship and support, I am truly grateful.

My heartfelt thanks and more to Susie for your unfailing moral and intellectual support, your kindness and good humour, the reassuring 4 am conversations, the everyday things that you took on so I could 'work on the book' and the not so everyday things - like your willingness to move country with me.

My mother left school in 1936 at the age of 16. In spite of not having a tertiary education she always maintained that 'an education was no load to carry'. I am indebted to her for always encouraging and supporting me to continue my education. This book is dedicated to my Mum, Hazel Fraser.

Finally, acknowledgements are made to the Higher Education Division of the Commonwealth Department of Education, Science and Training

-xiv-

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