Visualisation in Popular Fiction, 1860-1960: Graphic Narratives, Fictional Images

By Stuart Sillars | Go to book overview

NOTES

1

THE NATURE AND FUNCTION OF VISUALISATION

1
This is strange, since the study of popular art forms was not in itself foreign to either F.R. Leavis or Q.D. Leavis. The former's Mass Civilization and Minority Culture (with Denys Thompson, 1930) and the latter's Fiction and the Reading Public (1932) both discuss the arts of the people, not always with the sense of dismay that the incautious reader might expect; yet neither looks at the effects of illustrations in these works, or in the more celebrated studies which celebrate the canon.
2
The course is A102: An Arts Foundation Course, which discusses Dickens' Hard Times.
3
These are listed in the bibliography or cited in succeeding chapters as relevant.
4
Hogarth, subscription ticket for The Four Stages of Cruelty.
5
That the article has illustrations by Fred Walker, himself an illustrator of Thackeray and a painter who influenced figures such as Luke Fildes and the illustrators of the Graphic, is a further example of the complex links between visual and verbal texts of all kinds in the middle years of the nineteenth century.
6
Shakespeare Sacrificed-or-the Offering to Avarice, 20 June 1789. The Boydell Gallery was a collection of paintings commissioned by Alderman James Boydell from most of the leading artists of the day depicting subjects from Shakespeare's plays, subsequently issued in engraved form.
7
Gilpin wrote a series of books beginning with The Wye and South Wales, 1782 which became the basis of Picturesque and, later, Romantic tourism. In satirising them, Rowlandson was showing a literary sensibility at least equal to that of Gillray in his attacks on Boydell and Lewis.
8
Its full title was Life in London: or, the Day and Night Scenes of Jerry Hawthorn Esq., and his Elegant Friend Corinthian Tom. Accompanied by Bob Logic, the Oxonian, in their Rambles and Sprees through the Metropolis. This in itself is a striking statement of the publisher's desire to appeal to as

-175-

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Visualisation in Popular Fiction, 1860-1960: Graphic Narratives, Fictional Images
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Plates viii
  • Acknowledgements x
  • 1 - The Nature and Function of Visualisation 1
  • 2 - Graphic Narratives 30
  • 3 - Fairy Palaces 52
  • 4 - Illustrated Magazines 72
  • 5 - Gone to Earth and 1920s Landscape Ideology 93
  • 6 - The Romantic Continuum 113
  • 7 - Eagle and the Morality of Visual Narratives 132
  • 8 - Working-Class F(R)Ictions 154
  • Notes 175
  • References and Further Reading 179
  • Index 185
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