Reading Epic: An Introduction to the Ancient Narratives

By Peter Toohey | Go to book overview

INDEX
(The Table of Contents will also provide help in locating authors, their epics, the parts of their epics, and some of their themes. Chapter subheadings will also offer some orientation.)
a
Absyrtus (also Apsyrtus) 201 -3
Achaeans (also Greeks) 20, 43passim
Achilleid see Statius
Achilles 20, 43passim,51, 55, 64, 65, 82, 87, 109, 130, 131, 137, 143, 157, 180, 188, 194, 199, 228
Actium, battle of 124, 129, 135, 140
Adrastus 190 -6 passim
Aeetes see Aietes
Aegeus 102, 109 -10
Aegisthus 46, 52, 56, 64, 65
Aemilius Paulus 205 -10 passim
Aeneadae (Aeneas and his companions) 121 -43 passim
Aeneas 38, 94, 96, 121 -43 passim,151, 153, 155, 176, 177, 182, 183, 199, 208 -9
Aeolus 54, 87, 127, 141
Aeschylus 106, 189
Aeson 70, 71, 199
aesthetic play 19, 182, 223
Aethiopis36, 41, 44, 221
affective insight (Ovid) 158 -60
Agamemnon 20, 43passim,46, 48, 55, 60, 65 -6
Agenor 39, 40
aidōs9, 24, 28, 42, 43, 83, 134 ;
see also pietas
Aietes (sometimes Aeetes) 69, 89passim,201 -2
aition (plural aitia: 'brief tale or explanation concerning the origin of particular custom') 70, 74, 94, 98, 101, 102, 104, 106, 113, 139, 182
Ajax 6, 23, 43passim,44, 53, 55, 56
Alcestis215
Alcimus Ecdicius Avitus 221
Alcinous 50, 51, 52, 55, 87, 225
Alexander the Great 68, 182
Alexandria 68 -9
Alexandrian poetics 125, 146, 160, 170, 171, 181, 192 ;
under Nero 182
Alexandrian voice 139 -42 (Virgil), 149 -50 (Ovid);
see also humour and Alexandrian poetics
allegory 211, 217
allusion (also intertextuality) 17, 18, 80, 101, 106, 147, 161 -3
amēchanos amplakiē ('hapless error') 70, 75 ;
amēchanos ('helpless') 77 ;
amēchaneōn ('helpless') 79 ;
amēchaniē ('helplessness') 86, 172
Amycus 77, 78, 88, 104, 200 -1
Anchises 94, 127, 131, 137, 151
Andromache 28, 30, 40
Annales95 -9;
see also Ennius
anti-Augustanism 152
Antigone 180, 193, 195 -6
Antigonids 68
Antimachus of Colophon 75, 76, 80, 189, 222 ;
see also 'Thebaid'
Antinous 48, 53, 59, 60, 61, 63, 66
Antony, Mark (also Antonius, Marcus) 123, 129, 134, 140, 176 -7

-242-

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Reading Epic: An Introduction to the Ancient Narratives
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction xi
  • 1 - Epic- The Genre, Its Characteristics 1
  • 2 - Homer, Iliad 20
  • 3 - Homer, Odyssey 44
  • 4 - Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica 68
  • 5 - Beginning Epic in Rome 90
  • 6 - The Alexandrian Miniature Epic 100
  • 7 - Virgil, Aeneid 121
  • 8 - Ovid, Metamorphoses 144
  • 9 - Lucan, the Civil War 166
  • 10 - Roman Epic and the Emperor Domitian 186
  • 11 - Ends and Beginnings; Late Ancient Epic 211
  • Appendix- The Epic and the Novel 224
  • Bibliography 230
  • Index 242
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