New Directions in the History of Nursing: International Perspectives

By Barbara Mortimer; Susan McGann | Go to book overview

3

Bergljot Larsson (1883-1968), founder and leader of the Norwegian Nursing Association

A case study of the influence of international nursing

Sigrun Hvalvik

On 24 September 1912, Bergljot Larsson called in 'sisters' from the whole of Norway to discuss the establishment of an association for educated nurses. A few hours after the meeting took place, the Norwegian Nursing Association (NNA) was born, one of the last nursing associations to be founded in Scandinavia; Finland, Denmark and Sweden had already established their organizations. The decision to found the NNA was not made overnight. The idea was conceived not long after Larsson started to work as a nurse and was nurtured during her stay in Scotland from 1909 to 1911. By the time she attended her first international nursing congress, at Cologne in August 1912, preparations in Norway were almost complete. In the processes that led up to the final establishment of the NNA, inspiration, ideas, knowledge and support were provided by a range of individuals and institutions both within and beyond Norway. Larsson was the first president of the NNA, a position she held for twenty-three years.

This chapter argues that Larsson's formative work experience abroad, and her professional contact with European nursing leaders, informed the initiative she took in founding the NNA. Her experiences abroad were also of great significance for her further actions as a leader of the organization. In the first part of the chapter, priority is given to the period of her life passed in Edinburgh. During her stay in the Scottish capital, she met members of the British women's movement and supporters of the British campaign for state registration. These encounters contributed to the creation of her fundamental views regarding women and nursing. The ways in which these views or visions were nurtured during her stay are also traced. In the last part of the chapter, a further argument is proposed that Larsson's visions were crucial for the founding of the NNA itself, and influenced the issues and projects she promoted during her time as leader. As regards her contact with European nursing leaders, it is proposed that these contacts provided practical insights and the encouragement she needed to transform her visions and ideas into the reality of the NNA.


THE STARTING POINT

When Larsson left Norway in 1909 'to study nursing in Edinburgh', an expression she used herself, she was twenty-six years old. After a one-year training course in

-40-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
New Directions in the History of Nursing: International Perspectives
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 207

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.