The Obesity Epidemic: Science, Morality, and Ideology

By Michael Gard; Jan Wright | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

From Michael

The research that produced this book was supported by Charles Sturt University's Faculty of Education, School of Human Movement Studies and Office for Research and Graduate Studies. Thanks go to all my colleagues and friends at Charles Sturt University who, together, create such a warm working environment. In particular, I would like to acknowledge the support, insights and friendship of my Head of School, Frank Marino, who continues to be a steadying influence on all who have the good fortune to work with him. Thanks, as ever, to Bob Meyenn for his care, interest and support. Thanks also to Ramona Wesley and Tony O'Neill for their assistance in the final hectic weeks.

I am grateful to the Auckland College of Education for its financial support of my visit to New Zealand in 2003 during which I was able to present, discuss and develop this work. Special thanks to Bruce Ross for his scholarly input and to the Ovens family for their hospitality.

My parents, Beverly and Ralph, have patiently and lovingly watched over all my mistakes, stumbles and occasional triumphs. I hope this book brings them some small pleasure and reward for all they have done.

Throughout the ups and downs of writing of this book I was sustained by both the Gards and Lecouteurs and by my Bathurst family. They have all been indispensable in their own way.

Finally, this book would not have happened without the encouragement, hard work, friendship and inspiration of Sharon Pickering.


From Jan

My thanks to my family Nick, Kate and Tim for their patience and support and to Tina for her editorial support in the final versions of the manuscript.


Contributor biography

Bruce Ross has published on muscle cramp and motor unit recruitment, physical education history and philosophy and tertiary teaching from a Freirian perspective. Currently he teaches Bachelor of Physical Education students at the Auckland College of Education after twenty-eight years as a senior lecturer in work physiology at the University of Otago School of Physical Education.

-viii-

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The Obesity Epidemic: Science, Morality, and Ideology
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Acknowledgements viii
  • 1 - Science and Fatness 1
  • 2 - The War on Obesity 16
  • 3 - The Ghost of a Machine 37
  • 4 - 'Modernity's Scourge' 68
  • 5 - Fat or Fiction 86
  • 6 - The Search for a Cause 107
  • 7 - Obesity Science for the People 126
  • 8 - Feminism and the 'Obesity Epidemic' 153
  • 9 - Interrogating Expert Knowledge 168
  • 10 - Beyond Body Weight 187
  • References 191
  • Index 210
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