Notes

Chapter One

Originality and Artistic Expression

1
Walter Benjamin, 'The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction', 1936, as excerpted in Charles Harrison and Paul Wood (eds), Art in Theory 1900-1990: An Anthology of Changing Ideas (Oxford: Blackwell, 1992), p. 515.
2
André Malraux, Le Musée imaginaire, which is vol. I of his The Psychology of Art (New York: Pantheon Books, 1949-50).
3
Roger Scruton claims that photography cannot be an independent representational art on this basis. See his 'Photography and Representation' and 'Fantasy, Imagination and the Screen', both reprinted in his The Aesthetic Understanding (London: Methuen, 1983) and his 'The Photographic Surrogate', reprinted in his The Philosopher on Dover Beach (Manchester: Carcanet, 1990).
4
See Bill Jay, Nigel Warburton and David Hockney, Brandt (London: ipublish.com, 1999) and Nigel Warburton's 'Individual Style in Photographic Art', British Journal of Aesthetics 36, no. 4, 1996, pp. 389-97, reprinted in Alex Neill and Aaron Ridely (eds), Arguing about Art, 2nd edn (London: Routledge, 2002).
5
See Saul Kripke, Naming and Necessity (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1980), pp. 110-15.
6
See David Davies, Art as Performance (Oxford: Blackwell, 2004), who argues that our rejection of fakes and forgeries shows that artistic value can't be wholly reduced to the value of the experiences art works afford. For further elaboration of this line of thought see his 'Against Enlightened Empiricism' in Matthew Kieran (ed.), Contemporary Debates in Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art (Oxford: Blackwell, 2005). I am indebted to a long and engaging correspondence with David, which included discussion of the Van Meegeren forgery case and the achievements of cubism, which influenced my views on this matter.
7
As the foremost empiricist philosopher it is no surprise that Hume held this view: 'all the general rules of art are founded only on experience, and on the observation of the common sentiments of human nature', p. 138. See his 'Of the Standard of Taste', originally published 1757, included in his Selected Essays (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1993). More contemporarily we have Malcolm Budd claiming that 'a perspicuous elucidation of the concept of artistic value is possible

-256-

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Revealing Art
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations ix
  • Acknowledgements xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter One - Originality and Artistic Expression 6
  • Chapter Two - Beauty Resurrected 47
  • Chapter Three - Insight in Art 99
  • Chapter Four - Art and Morality 148
  • Chapter Five - The Truth in Humanism 205
  • Notes 256
  • Bibliography and Suggested Reading 263
  • Index 273
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