The Communist Movement in the Arab World

By Tareq Y. Ismael | Go to book overview

Appendix 1

“A Manifesto to the Peoples of the East”*

PEOPLES OF THE EAST

Six years ago, there broke out in Europe a colossal and monstrous carnage, a world war in which 35,000,000 human lives were lost, hundreds of major cities and thousands of villages destroyed, European countries devastated, and all the peoples were subjected to the torment of unheard-of poverty and unprecedented starvation.

Up to the present time, this colossal war has been waged in Europe, only partially affecting Asia and Africa.

This war was waged by the European peoples and the peoples of the East took a relatively small part in it: only the forces of hundreds of thousands of Turkish peasants who were deceived by their rulers and led by German capitalists, and from two to three million Indians and Negroes - slaves, bought by English and French capitalists and, as slaves, hurled to death on the fardistant, foreign battlefields of France, in defence of the foreign, and to them, unintelligible interests of English and French bankers and industrialists.

Although the peoples of the East remained aloof from this gigantic war, although they took only a insignificant part in it, nevertheless, this carnage was waged, not for the countries of Europe, not for the countries and peoples of the West, but for the countries and peoples of the East.

It was waged for the partition of the entire world, and mainly for the partition of Asia, for the partition of the East. It was waged in order to determine who will control the Asiatic countries, whose slaves the peoples of the East will be.

It was waged in order to determine precisely who, the English or the German capitalists, will skin the Turkish, Persian, Egyptian, and Indian peasants and workers.

The monstrous four years of carnage ended in a victory for England and France. The German capitalists were crushed, and along with them the entire German people were likewise crushed, destroyed, and doomed to

* Originally published in Kommunisticheskii Internatsional , no. 15 (Petrograd, December 20, 1920).

-124-

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The Communist Movement in the Arab World
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Tables viii
  • Preface ix
  • 1 - The Heritage of Arab Communist Parties 1
  • 2 - The Soviet Legacy 17
  • 3 - The Soviet Union and Arab Issues: 1919-1967 41
  • 4 - The Soviet Union and Arab Issues: 1967-1984 71
  • 5 - Perestroika and After 84
  • 6 - The Crisis of Communism in the Arab World 102
  • Appendix 1 124
  • Appendix 2 133
  • Appendix 3 143
  • Appendix 4 147
  • Appendix 5 163
  • Appendix 6 180
  • Notes 186
  • Index 205
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