Demystifying Grant Seeking: What You Really Need to Do to Get Grants

By Larissa Golden Brown; Martin John Brown | Go to book overview

The Thurston Family Foundation and Port City Partnership for the Arts:
Grant Narrative

Request

Port City Partnership for the Arts respectfully requests a grant of $15,000 from the Thurston Family Foundation to establish Project 21C, a year-round arts engagement program including education, performances/shows, and social gatherings. Project 21C provides access to the arts to people aged 20 to 40 who have typically not attended events and performances. The project builds the next generation of arts lovers and patrons in our region.


Port City Partnership for the Arts (PCPA)

As a Williams Art Foundation program officer, Mary Ryan heard repeatedly from applicants on two points: they needed to continually grow their audiences and reach out to new people, but they also needed to minimize their overhead expenses.

In 1990, Ryan left her post at the Williams Foundation to establish the Port City Partnership for the Arts to address these concerns. Most people said it couldn't be done, but Ryan and a core group of volunteers convinced the major arts organizations in Port City that by cooperating they could reach their goals more quickly and less expensively, and they could reach a larger and more diverse audience together than any of them could alone.

After two years of research and planning, the Partnership began full operations in 1992, with 12 member organizations. Today, PCPA has 32 members, which all recognize that they share a common pool of current and potential audiences and patrons. We facilitate shared annual scheduling of events and provide centralized and cost-effective marketing, public relations, fund development services, ticket sales, and evaluation surveys for all 32 members.


Community need

Though they have seen hours and hours of television, over a quarter of all Port City elementary school students have never seen a live play. Though many dream of being ballerinas, a full 90% of Port City kindergarten students have never been to the ballet. And according to Port City Public Schools, too many students report that they rarely or never paint or draw at home.

Yet Greg Sparks, Superintendent of Port City Public Schools, announced in his State of the Schools address this year that the arts open doors to other subjects, such as social studies, history, science, and math. He, like many others, recognizes the link between art appreciation, self-expression, and success in other areas of life.

Unfortunately, as our community's children grow older and graduate from high school and college, their interest in the arts often falls off entirely. In a recent survey, the Port City Arts Council found that only 32% of all adults ages 20 to 30 had attended either an opera, symphony, ballet, or theater performance in the past year. When questioned as to non-attendance, many cited feeling a barrier to attending, such as not knowing how to get tickets, not knowing where events are held, or not being able to afford tickets.

PCPA and our member organizations are concerned. This younger group, and those up to around age 40, are the future supporters and patrons of our arts organizations. As well, they are the parents of the following generation of arts lovers. The fact that they are perceiving strong barriers to participating in the arts may not only be limiting their own enrichment, but may also be devastating to the Port City cultural community's future.

-223-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Demystifying Grant Seeking: What You Really Need to Do to Get Grants
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 241

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.