Teacher Appraisal Observed

By E. C. Wragg; F. J. Wikeley et al. | Go to book overview

Chapter 6

Teachers' views of appraisal

In the previous chapter we looked at the appraisal process in one particular school. This chapter will discuss teachers' perspectives on appraisal as they emerged from our interviews and observations of the twenty-nine case studies of primary and secondary teachers in Study 3 of the research project. Their perceptions often broaden and deepen the generalities which emerged from the national questionnaire survey described in Chapter 4.


PURPOSES OF APPRAISAL

From the very first interview appraisers and appraisees had been asked what they thought was the purpose of appraisal and also what advantages or disadvantages they saw in having a formal scheme. They found it difficult to separate their answers to these two questions but they did distinguish between what they felt to be the Government's aims and the purposes that they felt appraisal could serve if carried out properly.

Some concern was expressed about the introduction of performance-related pay and the role appraisal might play in its introduction. However, most teachers seemed happy with the reassurance they had received from the LEAs and their own senior management that this was not the hidden intention, so their responses were mostly based on the scheme that they were being presented with and not hypothetical developments. Their subsequent answers ranged along a continuum, with those referring to the assessment of teacher performance at one end, and those using the language of staff development at the other.


Appraisal as assessment of teacher performance

A number of teachers identified the aim of appraisal as the summative assessment of their classroom practice. These responses could be split into identifying incompetent teachers, or as an opportunity to 'celebrate

-118-

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Teacher Appraisal Observed
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Tables vi
  • Preface viii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - The Appraisal of Teaching 5
  • Chapter 2 - Classroom Observation 23
  • Chapter 3 - The Role of the Local Education Authority 35
  • Chapter 4 - The National Perspective 60
  • Chapter 5 - Appraisal in Casewell School 94
  • Chapter 6 - Teachers' Views of Appraisal 118
  • Chapter 7 - Preparing for Observation 141
  • Chapter 8 - The Implementation of Lesson Observation 155
  • Chapter 9 - Improving Appraisal-Learning from Experience 186
  • Bibliography 204
  • Index 207
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