GLOSSARY

a
aestheticism a primarily nineteenth-century French artistic sensibility which espoused the idea of art for art's sake, claiming beauty had little to do with morality, and was a higher pursuit for the artist. English aestheticists, such as Oscar Wilde, Arthur Symons and A.C. Swinburne, claimed beauty as the only criterion for and gauge of art.
art nouveau a pronouncedly asymmetrical and symbolical decorative style dominant in Europe at the end of the nineteenth century and the start of the twentieth century.

c
collective unconscious a term coined by Carl Jung to express his belief that there is a repository in all minds containing a pool of universal archetypes that express humanity's deep psychic nature.
condensation/displacement as formulated by Sigmund Freud, mechanisms by which latent unconscious processes and symptoms are manifested to the conscious mind in dreams. In condensation the content of one or more complex chains of association in the unconscious are reduced to a single idea in the dream. In displacement, a kind of mental censorship, the symptom is moved to another associated idea in order to alter its emphasis or intensity.

d
dialectic originally a method of argumentation in Greek philosophy, dialectic was used by the German philosopher G.W.F. Hegel to describe a process in which an idea or thesis when opposed by an antithesis, or counter-idea, leads to a new idea, or synthesis. In the phrase 'dialectical materialism', Karl Marx adapted Hegel's use of the term to describe a political struggle between two classes resulting in a new socio-economic order.
discourse the idea of discourse in the sense used here is associated with the French theorist Michel Foucault and describes the power with which institutionalised language in its naturalness, authority, professionalism, assertiveness and antitheoretical directness restricts what is 'in the true'. Discourses are established ways of thinking resulting from the power of institutionalised socio-historical forces which determine and delimit the meaning and worth of positions adopted in any given

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Modernism
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Series Editor's Preface ix
  • Acknowledgements xi
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Interpreting and Changing 26
  • 2 - Genres, Art and Film 72
  • 3 - Texts, Contexts, Intertexts 129
  • Glossary 208
  • Bibliography 213
  • Index 220
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