Leaders in War: West Point Remembers the 1991 Gulf War

By Frederick W. Kagan; Chris Kubik | Go to book overview

8

FRATRICIDE AT AR RUMAYLAH

Major Jonathan J. Negin

The 3rd Squadron, 3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment (ACR) began to rail-load its combat equipment on 22 August 1990 in Fort Bliss, Texas. Five days later, all the equipment was loaded and moving toward the port for sea transport. The regiment delivered its aircraft to Beaumont, Texas, where they were prepared for transportation. The regiment deployed to Saudi Arabia in September. Initially, the regiment's mission was to serve as a counterattack force in the defense of Saudi Arabia.

As the theater developed, however, and as CENTCOM began planning offensive operations, LTG Gary Luck placed the 3rd ACR on the XVIII Airborne Corps' right flank-side by side with the VII Corps' 2nd ACR and 1st Armored Division. This required close coordination from the beginning to prevent the friendly units from crossing into each other's paths. On 22 January 1991, the 3rd ACR made the first combat contact with Iraqi forces near this boundary with VII Corps.1The unit was the Third Platoon of I Troop, 3rd ACR. The platoon leader was Lieutenant Jonathan Negin.

When the ground war began, the 3rd ACR attacked north in sector, maintaining coordination with the 1st Armored Division on its right. Maintaining the right distance between two large, fast-moving armored forces is difficult anywhere, and the vast featureless desert made this task even more so. But the units managed to coordinate well enough to maintain safe distances throughout the attack north. The 'left hook' maneuver, furthermore, although strategically brilliant, was cause for tactical complexities.

On 26 February, LTG Luck realized that the VII Corps' turn toward northern Kuwait had opened a 50 kilometer gap between the two Corps. In order to close the gap, Luck ordered the execution of Contingency Plan (CONPLAN) Ridgeway. This plan called for the 3rd ACR to be reassigned to VII Corps' 24th Infantry Division.2After this reassignment became effective, MG McCaffrey, the 24th Infantry Division commander, ordered the 3rd ACR to attack an airfield along the east-west boundary between the two Corps. The attack was a deadly one, but not for Iraqis. The 3rd ACR mistakenly attacked friendly forces-engineers from the 54th Engineer Battalion, 1st Armored Division.

-118-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Leaders in War: West Point Remembers the 1991 Gulf War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Part 1 - Senior Combat Commanders 9
  • 1 - The Battle for Norfolk 11
  • 2 - Attacking the Republican Guard 25
  • 3 - Airborne Unit Operations 44
  • Part 2 - Combat Support and Combat Service Support at the Theater Level 53
  • 4 - Theater Logistical Support 55
  • 5 - Military Police Support 76
  • 6 - Strategic Military Intelligence Support 83
  • Part 3 - Junior Combat Commanders 103
  • 7 - The Battle of 73 Easting 105
  • 8 - Fratricide at Ar Rumaylah 118
  • Part 4 - Combat Support and Combat Service Support at the Tactical Level 137
  • 9 - Tactical Logistics Support 139
  • 10 - Platoon Leader Challenges 149
  • 11 - Tactical Engineer Support 166
  • 12 - Training “individual Ready Reserve” Soldiers 176
  • Conclusion 181
  • References 194
  • Index 195
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 200

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.