The Royal Navy and Maritime Power in the Twentieth Century

By Ian Speller | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The inspiration for this book came from the participation of all of the contributors in the supervision of maritime case studies undertaken by students at the UK Joint Services Command and Staff College (JSCSC). It is important, therefore, to recognise the indirect contribution that staff and students at that institution have made to this work. By challenging and questioning many of the traditional assumptions about maritime power, they have encouraged all of the authors to think very carefully about the issues addressed in this book. Complacency has not been an option. The editor would also like to thank the staff and students at the Irish Defence Forces Command and Staff School for providing him with a similarly stimulating intellectual environment on the other side of the Irish Sea. As ever, a vote of thanks is due to the staff at the various libraries and archives used to research this work, with particular mention due to the staff of the JSCSC Library and the Public Records Office at Kew. I am grateful to Stephen Prince at the Naval Historical Branch for making available photographs to illustrate the cover of this book and to Karol Mullaney-Dignam for helping to choose between them. The editor owes a particular debt to Eoin and Colette, to whom this book is dedicated.

Ian Speller

-xiii-

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The Royal Navy and Maritime Power in the Twentieth Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword xi
  • Acknowledgements xiii
  • Abbreviations xiv
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - The Transition to War 13
  • 2 - Sea Control in Narrow Waters 33
  • 3 - Sea Denial, Interdiction and Diplomacy 50
  • 4 - Air Power and Evacuations 67
  • 5 - Amphibious Operations 88
  • 6 - Maritime Power and Complex Crises 108
  • 7 - Quarantine Operations 129
  • 8 - Maritime Jurisdiction and the Law of the Sea 148
  • 9 - Naval Diplomacy 164
  • 10 - Operations in a War Zone 181
  • 11 - From Peacekeeping to Peace Enforcement 197
  • Select Bibliography 209
  • Index 215
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