Territory and Terror: Conflicting Nationalisms in the Basque Country

By Jan Mansvelt Beck | Go to book overview

4

Euskal Herria

Rhetoric of commonness versus uncommon practice

Introduction

In the imagined community of Basque nationalists the people of Euskal Herria are one big family living in a future state. They feel united because they are supposed to share historical roots, common symbols and a strong wish to form an independent nation-state. At present, all Basque nationalist parties are aiming to bring about the creation of an independent Greater Basque Country or Euskal Herria or Euzkadi as they call it. The PNV, the nationalist party which attracts the most votes, emphasizes in its third general principle 'the recognition of “Euzkadi” as Patria and territory on both sides of the Pyrenees where the Basque Nation lives, the Ikurriña as the Flag and Euzko Abendaren Ereserkia as the Anthem' (EAJ-PNV 2002, 1 September). The other nationalist parties - Batasuna (Unity), Eusko Alkartasuna (EA/Basque Solidarity), and Abertzaleen Batasuna (AB/Patriotic Unity) - have the same projection of the outer borders of their future state. Basque nationalists on both sides of the State border usually support the idea of Euskal Herria by references to common culture and history. In this chapter the nationalist narrative on Basque commonness will be compared with linguistic, socio-cultural, and political practice. I will demonstrate that the rhetoric of Basque commonness is not reflected in the formation of a pan-Basque national space.


Nationalist claims: a short history of territorial and linguistic demands

Notions of Basque singularity have always been the foundation of a common fatherland. Historically the discourse of Basque singularity has been multifaceted, fluid over time and influenced by Zeitgeist. Therefore conceptualizations of Basqueness reflected time-bounded scientific paradigms, political discourses and clerical views. Bidart's study on the approach to Basque singularity reflects a jumble of interpretations and metamorphoses, expressed in romantic, enlightened, republican, traditionalist, religious, fascist, nationalist and postmodernist versions (Bidart 2001). From the beginning of nationalist mobilization, Basque nationalists have been able to do their ideological shopping in a supermarket well supplied with ideas on who the Basques were. Some of these ideas have never become central to

-77-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Territory and Terror: Conflicting Nationalisms in the Basque Country
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents vii
  • Figures x
  • Tables xi
  • Acknowledgements xii
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - The French-Basque Experience 19
  • 3 - The Spanish-Basque Experience 41
  • 4 - Euskal Herria 77
  • 5 - Basque Nationalism 97
  • 6 - Euskadi as a Weak Proto-State 126
  • 7 - The Spatial Dimension of Violence 176
  • 8 - Conflict Solutions 205
  • Conclusion 225
  • Bibliography 233
  • Index 253
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 263

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.