Navigating Perilous Waters: An Israeli Strategy for Peace and Security

By Ephraim Sneh | Go to book overview

2

BETWEEN THE JORDAN AND THE SEA

“The heart of the conflict”-that is the shopworn but true phrase that expresses the Israeli-Palestinian conflict's place in the overall Arab-Israeli conflict over the land of Israel in the tapestry of relationships in the region, and the deep emotional element bound up in the struggle between the two peoples.

This conflict is fundamentally a conflict between two national movements for rule over a narrow strip of land between the Jordan River to the east and the Mediterranean Sea to the west. The area is densely populated, both peoples are deeply attached to the land, and there is no solution other than to divide the land between them. Division of the territory, if final and accompanied by a general formula for coexistence between the peoples, will bring about a historic reconciliation.

Continuation of hostilities means the terrible reality of thousands of casualties and the destruction of both the Palestinian and Israeli nations' economies. Reconciliation and economic cooperation between these two energetic and educated peoples, on the other hand, bears an enormous potential for economic vigor.

The gap between the two alternatives is extreme indeed. When I served as the head of the civil administration in the West Bank (1985-1987), I got to know the Palestinians from close up. Since then-especially since then-I have believed very strongly that reconciliation is inevitable, and I believe in the economic benefits of Israeli-Palestinian cooperation. I continue

-7-

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Navigating Perilous Waters: An Israeli Strategy for Peace and Security
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page vii
  • Contents ix
  • Preface xi
  • 1 - Perilous Waters 1
  • 2 - Between the Jordan and the Sea 7
  • 3 - Egypt 27
  • 4 - Jordan 33
  • 5 - Syria 39
  • 6 - Iraq's Vague Future 49
  • 7 - Iran 55
  • 8 - Will the World Change? 65
  • 9 - A Warning Note 71
  • 10 - Two Essential Conditions 75
  • 11 - The New Deterrence 85
  • 12 - The United States 91
  • 13 - Regional Alliances 101
  • 14 - National Resolve 105
  • Index 117
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