Hearts and Minds: Self-Esteem and the Schooling of Girls

By Jane Kenway; Sue Willis | Go to book overview

Notes on Contributors

Bill Cope is a senior research fellow at the Centre for Multicultural Studies at the University of Wollongong. His main areas of interest are multicultural education and historical research into the questions of Australian identity. On this latter theme his PhD traced changes in Australian identity as reflected in history and social studies textbooks since 1945. He is a co-author of Mistaken Identity: Multiculturalism and the Demise of Nationalism in Australia (Pluto Press, 1988). He has published widely on multicultural education and curriculum theory, as well as being actively involved in the Social Literacy Curriculum Project since 1979.

Pat Dudgeon is currently Head of the Centre for Aboriginal Studies, Curtin University of Technology. She was born and grew up in Darwin of Broome parents-Aboriginal (Asian); she holds a BAppSc (Psychology) and a GradDip in Psychology (Counselling). Her special interests are in tertiary Aboriginal education.

Pam Gilbert taught in secondary schools for many years, but is now a lecturer in education at James Cook University. Her research and teaching interests are in the connections between language, literature, education and gender, and recent publications include Coming Out from Under: Contemporary Australian Women's Writing, Writing, Schooling and Deconstruction and Gender, Literacy and the Classroom.

Pam Jonas taught at Malvern Girls' High in Victoria for ten years. She has had extensive involvement in the development of alternative curriculum for senior school students and is currently the executive officer of the STC group.

Mary Kalantzis is a senior research fellow at the Centre for Multicultural Studies at the University of Wollongong, where she has worked since

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