Emotion in Social Relations: Cultural, Group, and Interpersonal Processes

By Brian Parkinson; Agneta H. Fisher et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 6

Moving Faces in Interpersonal Life

In the everyday business of interpersonal interaction, faces do a lot of the important work. As well as carrying their own specific meanings, they set the tone for whatever else is happening, ironizing the surface content of a sentence or drawing attention to hidden semantic subtleties. A criticism delivered with a smile or wink, for example, has a quite different effect from one accompanied by scowls. Being face-to-face also makes obvious and inescapable differences to how we engage with one another. Catching someone's eye is often a prerequisite to starting a conversation, and the course of the ensuing dialogue is directed and redirected by the exchange of looks, yawns, and grimaces. As we interact, we seem to be acutely responsive to the slightest twitch or contraction of facial muscle.

Why do people devote so much attention to faces? The obvious answer is that important information can be derived from them. But that is only part of the story. Our looking also conveys our engagement. The act of collecting information provides information collected by the other person in a corresponding act. We see each other collecting information and coordinate our perspectives (or arrive at opposing positions, or break away from the interaction). More generally, facial movements (including looking) not only serve to provide information for someone else to decode, but also play a more direct role in the performance of interpersonal action.

This chapter reviews psychological thinking about faces as sources of information and as vehicles for action. We try to broaden the usual

-147-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Emotion in Social Relations: Cultural, Group, and Interpersonal Processes
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • About the Authors xi
  • Preface xiii
  • Chapter 1 - Emotion's Place in the Social World 1
  • Chapter 2 - Emotional Meaning Across Cultures 25
  • Chapter 3 - Cultural Variation in Emotion 55
  • Chapter 4 - Group Emotion 87
  • Chapter 5 - Intergroup Emotion 115
  • Chapter 6 - Moving Faces in Interpersonal Life 147
  • Chapter 7 - Interpersonal Emotions 179
  • Chapter 8 - Interconnecting Contexts 219
  • References 259
  • Author Index 285
  • Subject Index 295
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 298

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.