Organizing Black America: An Encyclopedia of African American Associations

By Nina Mjagkij | Go to book overview

E

East Bay Negro Historical Society

On July 2, 1965, Eugene and Ruth Lasartemay, Jesse and Marcella Ford, Madison Harvey, and cartoonist Morrie Turner established the East Bay Negro Historical Society (EBNHS) in Berkeley, California. They founded the organization to house black historical materials that previously had been held in family and individual collections. Until the rapidly growing collection compelled the EBNHS to move to a west Oakland storefront within a few years, the Lasartemays stored the artifacts under their bed in their home.

The EBNHS grew out of the Carter G. Woodson Negro history study groups that proliferated earlier in the twentieth century. Its mission to collect, record, present, and disseminate information about the history and culture of African Americans and people of African descent in the East Bay, California, and the western United States also included teaching and community outreach. In 1966, educator Marcella Ford became the first person to teach African American history in night classes in the East Bay public schools.

During the first two decades of its founding, the EBNHS developed and presented black history exhibits, lectures, and programs in schools and institutions throughout the Bay Area. In the early 1970s, it published the Newsletter, which later changed its name to Chronicle of Black History.

In 1987, the EBNHS became the Northern California Center for Afro-American History and Life (NCCAAHL). Under Executive Director Dr. Lawrence P. Crouchett, the NCCAAHL received a grant from the state of California for the Visions Project, Crouchett, Lonnie G. Bunch, III, and Martha Kendall Winnacker authored the first book about the African American community in the East Bay, Visions toward Tomorrow: The History of the East Bay Afro-American Community, 1852-1977, which was published by the NCCAAHL in 1989. That same year, the NCCAAHL mounted an exhibition, Visions toward Tomorrow: The East Bay Afro-American Community, 1852-1977, at the Oakland Museum of California. This represented the museums first black exhibit developed and curated by a black organization. The Visions Project and the 1990 debut of the From the Archives newsletter, edited by Crouchett, announced a more scholarly direction for the NCCAAHL. Crouchett died in 1993.

In 1994, the NCCAAHL merged with the Oakland Public Library and became the African American Museum and Library at Oakland (AAMLO). Senior curator Robert L. Haynes served as interim executive director of AAMLO from 1994 to 1995; Hope Hayes served as administrative director from 1995 to 1998; and in July 1998 Mae Bolton became AAMLO's administrative director.

AAMLO, a regional resource center for scholars, the media, and the general public, houses materials by and about African Americans in California and the West. Federal, state, and local funding enabled AAMLO to relocate to expanded facilities in the refurbished Charles Green Library in Oakland's civic center. The site houses a permanent exhibit on California's black history and is the repository for the organization's manuscript, photographic, and material-culture collection. Under the curatorship of Robert L. Haynes, this collection has expanded to include the papers of U.S. Representative Ronald Dellums, U.S. Representative Barbara Lee, Oakland Mayor and former state legislator Elihu Harris, and journalist Belva Davis, the first African American female television journalist in California.

East Bay Negro Historical Society

-219-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Organizing Black America: An Encyclopedia of African American Associations
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction vii
  • List of Entries ix
  • A 1
  • B 87
  • C 133
  • D 207
  • E 219
  • F 227
  • G 241
  • H 257
  • I 265
  • J 287
  • K 295
  • L 299
  • M 319
  • N 351
  • O 535
  • P 549
  • R 599
  • S 603
  • T 653
  • U 663
  • V 685
  • W 689
  • Y 707
  • Z 715
  • Addendum 717
  • Index 727
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 768

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.