Moral Education and Pluralism

By Mal Leicester; Celia Modgil et al. | Go to book overview

Contents
Contributors vi
Editors' Foreword
Mal Leicester,
Celia Modgil and
Sohan Modgilviii
Part One: Reflections
1 Society's Voice
Nick Tate3
2 Should Moral Educators Abandon Moral Relativism?
Glynn Phillips8
3 A Clarification of Some Key Terms in Values Discussions
David Aspin16
4 The Meaning of Dominance, the Dominance of Meaning, and the Morality of the Matter
Barbara Applebaum and
Dwight Boyd32
5 From Cultural Patchwork to Rainbows: Tightropes in Values Education
John Colbeck47
6 The Cultural Desert of Schooling
Tony Skillen58
7 Manifestations of Relativism and Individualism in Moral Judgments of Individuals: Implications for Moral Education
Mordecai Nisan71
Part Two: Curriculum Dimensions
8 Developing a Values Framework for Sex Education in a Pluralist Society
J. Mark Halstead85
9 Moral Imagination and the Case for Others
M.B. Wilkinson97
10 Value Conflict and Fair Play, and a Sports Education Worthy of the Name
Mike McNamee and
Carwyn Jones107
11 Learning Moral Commitment at University in a Plural Society
Gerald Collier116
12 Personal, Social and Moral Education in Latvia: Problems and Prospects
Krista Burane,
Augusts Milts,
Ieva Rocenaand
Janis Valbis123
13 Inclusive Moral Education: A Critique and Integration of Competing Approaches
Bill Puka131
14 Schemas, Culture and Moral Texts
Darcia Narvaez and
Christyan Mitchell149
Part Three: Moral Values
15 Values and Studentship in Post-compulsory Education and Training
Terry Hyland161
16 What Value the Postmodern in Values Education?
James W. Bell171
17 Authenticity, Teachers and the Future of Moral Education
James C. Conroy and
Robert A. Davis181
18 “E Pluribus Unum”: American Educational Values and the Struggle for Cultural Identity
Christopher R.L. Blake and
James Binko193
19 Values in Education: Definitely, 'Your Feet are Always in the Water'
Isabel Menezes and
B.P. Campos205
20 Valuing Being
Anthony J. Grainger216
21 Values in Multicultural Education: Whose Ethics?
Mark Mason226
Index 239

-v-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Moral Education and Pluralism
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 249

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.