Making Good Schools: Linking School Effectiveness and School Improvement

By David Reynolds; Robert Bollen et al. | Go to book overview

Chapter 5

Merging school effectiveness and school improvement

The knowledge bases

David Reynolds and Louise Stoll


INTRODUCTION

In Chapters 2, 3 and 4 of this volume we have seen something of the differing orientations that have existed between the two bodies of knowledge historically named 'school effectiveness' and 'school improvement'. Even sometimes in their basic goals concerning what the outcomes of education should be, the two different groups have had different perceptions, as Chapter Two reminded us, although both groups have increasingly converged in their goals and their practices of late, as we have noted in Chapter Four.

This chapter continues to move us forward by considering what the benefits would be of an integrated effectiveness/improvement paradigm in which the goal of creating improved school organisations is deemed sufficiently important to justify a suspension of any historical disciplinary rivalries. In the interests of encouraging further 'synergy' and integration between the perspectives, we outline in this chapter what role effectiveness research and improvement research/practice can perform for the integrated educational enterprise that we wish for, if it were prepared to examine itself and its historic roots critically and if it were prepared to cease 'reactive' posturing and substitute purposive intellectual and practical change.


SCHOOL EFFECTIVENESS AND SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT: AN INTERNATIONAL SURVEY

Whatever one's hopes concerning a 'merged' effectiveness/improvement paradigm in the future, it is clear that, historically, there have been problems in the relationship between the two communities. In North America, particularly within the United States, there exists

-94-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Making Good Schools: Linking School Effectiveness and School Improvement
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 154

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.