The Abacus and the Rainbow: Bergson, Proust, and the Digital-Analogic Opposition

By Donald R. Maxwell | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

This book is a revised and slightly enlarged version of a dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Romance Languages: French, in the University of Michigan, and as such its writing has incurred many debts. Primarily I am grateful to, Floyd Gray, Marcel Muller and William Paulson, members of my Doctoral Committee, for sharing with me not only their professional expertise, but also their skill, patience and unstinting help throughout the writing of the dissertation. Their advice and critical comments immeasurably improved both its content and style. I also thank Guy Mermier, Editor of this Series, for his corrections and comments on this final text.

In addition to their advice and help with the original and the revised text, I owe these scholars and teachers a special debt of gratitude for their outstanding graduate seminars. These helped me make the journey from the world and language of science, to the equally wonderful, yet so different culture, of literature. In innumerable ways, these seminars were Sesame to me, for they opened a door of perception into the enchanted world of literature and were the seed, the inspiration and incentive for present study.

This book necessarily contains comprehensive citations from the works of both Henri Bergson and of Marcel Proust. The quotations from Bergson come from his works published by Les Presses Universitaires de France. All the quotations from À la recherche du temps perdu are reproduced from the Gallimard Pléiade (1987—89) edition in four volumes prepared under the direction of Jean-Yves Tadié, and the citations from Proust's correspondence are taken from Choix de lettres, edited by Philip Kolb and published by Éditions

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