The Road Movie Book

By Steven Cohan; Ina Rae Hark | Go to book overview

Works Cited
Arrighi, Giovanni. The Long Twentieth Century: Money, Power, and the Origins of Our Times. New York: Verso, 1994.
Cawelti, John G., ed. Focus on Bonnie and Clyde. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1973.
Cook, David A. A History of Narrative Film. 3rd ed. New York: Norton, 1996.
Crary, Jonathan. “Spectacle, Attention, Counter Memory.” October 50 (Fall 1989): 97-107.
Crowther, Bosley. Rev. of Bonnie and Clyde. In Cawelti: 22-3.
Debord, Guy. The Society of the Spectacle. Detroit: Black and Red. 1977.
Dole, Robert. Address. Los Angeles, May 31, 1995.
Fisher, Nancy. Letter. New York Times Magazine (April 21, 1968): 21+.
Harvey, David. The Condition of Postmodernity. Cambridge, MA: Blackwell, 1989.
Jameson, Fredric. The Political Unconscious: Narrative as a Socially Symbolic Act. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1981.
Lévi-Strauss, Claude. “The Structural Study of Myth.” Critical Theory Since 1965, eds. Hazard Adams and Leroy Searle. Tallahassee: University Presses of Florida, 1986. 809-22.
Loomis, Carole J. “Forty Years of the Fortune 500.” Fortune 131.9 (May 15, 1995): 182-8.
Marcus, Greil. Lipstick Traces: A Secret History of the Twentieth Century. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1989.
Marx, Karl and Engels, Frederick. The Manifesto of the Communist Party, trans. Samuel Moore. Chicago: Charles H. Kerr Publishing Co., 1947.
McCarty, John. Hollywood Gangland: The Movies' Love Affair with the Mob. New York: St Martin's Press , 1993.
Naremore, James. “American Film Noir: The History of an Idea.” Film Quarterly 49.2 (Winter 1995-6): 12-28.
Penn, Arthur. “Bonnie and Clyde: An Interview with Arthur Penn.” By Jean-Louis Commolli and André S. Labarthe. In Cawelti: 15-19.
Perlstein, Rick. “Who Owns the Sixties?: The Opening of a Scholarly Generation Gap.” Lingua Franca 6.4 (May/June 1996): 30-7.
Plant, Sadie. The Most Radical Gesture: The Situationist International in a Postmodern Age. New York: Routledge, 1992.
Shnayerson, Michael. “Natural Born Opponents.” Vanity Fair (July, 1996): 98+.
Steele, Robert. “The Good-Bad and Bad-Good in Movies: Bonnie and Clyde and In Cold Blood.” In Cawelti: 115-21.
Stone, Oliver. “Making Movies Matter.” University of Michigan Ann Arbor, March 20, 1996.
--“Oliver Stone: Why Do I Have to Provoke?” By Gavin Smith. Sight and Sound (December, 1994): 8-12.
Viénet, René. Enragés and Situationists in the Occupation Movement, France, May '68 (1968). New York: Autonomedia, 1992.
Virilio, Paul. Speed and Politics: An Essay on Dromology. New York: Semiotext(e), 1977.

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The Road Movie Book
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Plates ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Works Cited 14
  • Part I - Mapping Boundaries 15
  • 1 - “hitler Can't Keep 'Em That Long” 17
  • 2 - Western Meets Eastwood 45
  • 3 - Mad Love, Mobile Homes, and Dysfunctional Dicks 70
  • Notes 86
  • Works Cited 89
  • 4 - On the Run and on the Road 90
  • Works Cited 107
  • Part II - American Roads 111
  • 5 - Almost like Being at Home 113
  • 6 - Wanderlust and Wire Wheels 143
  • 7 - Exposing Intimacy in Russ Meyer's Motorpsycho! and Faster Pussycat! Kill! Kill! 165
  • 8 - The Road to Dystopia 179
  • Works Cited 202
  • 9 - Fear of Flying 204
  • Notes 227
  • Works Cited 228
  • Part III - Alternative Routes 231
  • 10 - The Nation, the Body, and the Autostrada 233
  • 11 - “we Don't Need to Know the Way Home” 249
  • 12 - Hom E and Away 271
  • 13 - Race on the Road 287
  • 14 - Revitalizing the Road Genre 307
  • 15 - My Own Private Idaho and the New Queer Road Movies 330
  • 16 - Disassociated Masculinities and Geographies of the Road 349
  • Index of Films 371
  • General Index 375
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