Hiding in the Light: On Images and Things

By Dick Hebdige | Go to book overview

Notes and References

Introduction

1.
In the Conclusion to The Archaeology of Knowledge, Foucault confronts his own ambivalence towards French structuralism by conducting a debate between two imaginary adversaries. The Conclusion takes the form of a kind of self-interrogation. (In this way, Foucault 'himself escapes the finality of a conclusion; neither of the debating figures can be identified with their 'author'). At one point, the persona who has been given the job of defending Foucault's epistemology, says:

“But let us leave off our polemics about 'structuralism'; they hardly survive in areas now deserted by serious workers; this particular controversy, which might have been so fruitful, is now acted out only by mummers and tumblers.”

See Michel Foucault, The Archaeology of Knowledge, Tavistock, 1972. Later in the debate, this persona describes Foucault's project as an attempt “to deploy a dispersion that can never be reduced to a single system of differences…”. Such an aspiration may be vain (in both senses of the word) but the peculiar itinerary undertaken in this book was dictated by a similar ambition.

2.
See Roland Barthes, “The Rhetoric of the Image”, in Image-Music-Text, Fontana, 1977; Camera Lucida, Hill & Wang, 1981; Andre Bazin, “The Ontology of the Photograph” in What is Cinema? Vol. 1, University of California Press, 1967.
3.
Roland Barthes, op.cit., 1981.
4.
Andre Bazin, op.cit., 1967.

Chapter 1:

Hiding in the Light: Youth Surveillance and Display

1.
S. Hall, C. Critcher, T. Jefferson, J. Clarke and B. Roberts, Policing the Crisis: Mugging, the State and Law and Order, Macmillan, 1978.
2.
See “Imperialism, nationalism and organised youth” by M. Blanch, in J. Clarke, C. Critcher, R. Johnson (eds) Working Class Culture: Studies in History and Theory, Hutchinson, 1979, also Phil Cohen, “Policing the Working-Class City” and Ivy Pinchbeck and Margaret Hewitt, “Vagrancy and Delinquency in an urban setting”, in Crime and Society; Readings in History and Theory, Mike Fitzgerald, Gregor McLennan and Jennie Pawson (eds), Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1981.
3.
For the complicity between power/knowledge relations, the formation of modern State bureaucracies and the refinement of surveillance technologies see Michel Foucault, Discipline and Punish; the Birth of the Prison, trans. Alan Sheridan, Vintage, 1979; also “The Confession of the Flesh”, in Power/Knowledge: Selected Interviews and Writings 1972-1977 (ed.) Colin Gordon, trans. Colin Gordon, Leo Marshall, John Mepham and Kate Soper, Pantheon, 1980; and “The Subject and Power” in Critical Inquiry 8, 1982.

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