Handbook of Health Psychology

By Andrew Baum; Tracey A. Revenson et al. | Go to book overview

44
Subjective Risk and Health Protective Behavior:
Cancer Screening and Cancer Prevention
Leona S. Aiken
Mary A. Gerend
Arizona State University
Kristina M. Jackson
University of Missouri

This chapter explores the role of perceived risk in health protective behavior. Cancer serves as the context of the presentation; the discussion employs the literature on cancer screening and prevention to highlight theory and findings on the perception of risk in relation to health behavior. The origins of perceived risk, its role in health behavior models, and the linkages between perceived risk and behavior are explored. In models of health behavior, perceived risk for disease is the motivational engine for health protective action. This chapter is intended to serve two purposes: to provide both a broad picture of the literature on risk perception in health psychology and to characterize research on perceived risk for cancer as a putative determinant of cancer screening and preventive behavior.


CHAPTER OVERVIEW

The chapter first addresses the role of perceived susceptibility in models of health behavior. It then turns to perceived risk as a construct, its measurement, its observed relation to objective risk for cancer, and its determinants. It next explores the relation of perceived susceptibility and cancer distress to cancer screening and cancer preventive behavior. Here it considers not only the susceptibility-behavior link, but also explores other variables that may moderate or even mitigate the impact of perceived susceptibility on specific cancer protective behaviors. The chapter then considers interventions to increase screening and preventive behavior that involve the perceived susceptibility construct. The emphasis is on the use of mediational analysis to assess the direct and indirect impact of perceived susceptibility on screening and preventive behavior. Finally, it explores a number of issues that arise in consideration of how perceived susceptibility impacts health protective behavior.


CANCER PREVALENCE

Cancer is a feared disease of high prevalence. By age 59, over 8% of men and 9% of women will have developed an invasive cancer; from birth to death, these percentages rise to 47% of men and 38% of women (Landis, Murray, Bolden, & Wingo, 1998). Cancer is the second leading cause of death (23% of all deaths) behind heart disease (32%) among adults in the United States. In all, 1.23 million new cases of cancer and over 564,800 cancer deaths are expected in the United States in 1998 (Landis et al., 1998).


SCREENING AND PREVENTIVE RECOMMENDATIONS

The public is inundated with information about cancer and with recommendations for cancer screening and prevention.

-727-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Handbook of Health Psychology
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 962

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.