Terrorism and Guerrilla Warfare: Forecasts and Remedies

By Richard Clutterbuck | Go to book overview

Chapter two

The spectrum of political conflict

The bulwarks of a pluralist society

The deepest anxiety amongst ordinary people in a community arises when they perceive a threat of collapse of order and security; lest the lives of their families have no protection against armed intruders or rampaging mobs; and lest their property, their food stocks, and their savings become vulnerable to seizure or destruction without hope of restitution. This has been so for at least 12,000 years, since people first set up agricultural communities and villages, when survival and prosperity began manifestly to depend upon confidence that their crops and domestic animals would safely mature to provide their food, and that women and children would not be abducted while the men were hunting or working in the fields-in other words, that there was internal security under a rule of law with a collective means to enforce it. Then, as a village agricultural community became more prosperous than the nomadic tribes outside, external security also became essential lest the hungry tribesmen swarmed in to seize the animals and fertile fields and put the villagers to death or into bondage. Thus security and the rule of law were from the start and still remain the foundations of civilized society.

As societies developed, security and the rule of law became more complex. Villages organized themselves into mutually supporting settlements, sharing the land between them. Later they improved their defences against marauding bands with forts and walled cities. Cities grew into city states and groups of cities and settlements coalesced into nations. The larger the communities grew, the more complex became the hierarchy required to main-tain security and enforce the law. These hierarchies threw up strong men as chiefs or kings, and other strong men emerged to challenge them from within. Such societies were autocratic until the Greek city states developed the idea of democracy, with the

-5-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Terrorism and Guerrilla Warfare: Forecasts and Remedies
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 235

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.