Terrorism and Guerrilla Warfare: Forecasts and Remedies

By Richard Clutterbuck | Go to book overview

Chapter sixteen

Urban terrorist techniques

Damage to property

A number of contemporary groups using political violence prefer to avoid inflicting human casualties for fear of alienating public sympathy. These include FLNC, RZ, and the Autonomous Groups (see Chapter 15) and some of the more militant environmental and animal rights groups. They set their bombs and incendiary devices to go off during the night and sometimes warn the authorities or firms that, unless they concede to their demands, the next bombs will be set off in hours of peak activity, with maximum casualties, though this threat is seldom carried out.

The devices for precisely timed delay or remotely controlled firing are adequate for their needs. The likeliest changes are in their selection of targets. Maximum disruption can already be caused by putting a major computer system out of action, but the greater interdependence of business and industry and the growing mass and complexity of computerized records will make high technology industries, finance and insurance companies increasingly vulnerable. Hardware, software, and communications will all be vulnerable and disruption by hacking or feeding in fake programs may be more effective than bombing or burning. The development of more reliable technology and procedures for computer security will provide the best answer.


Bombs to kill

The worst recorded single terrorist bomb outrage was on 23 June 1985, when Sikh extremists planted a bag containing a bomb in the hold of an Air India jumbo jet flying from Montreal to India via London, which exploded in mid-Atlantic, killing 329 people. It was almost certainly fired by a delay fuse (not an altitude fuse) because it went off near the end of the Atlantic flight. On the

-171-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Terrorism and Guerrilla Warfare: Forecasts and Remedies
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 235

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.