Language, Literature, and Critical Practice: Ways of Analysing Text

By David Birch | Go to book overview

Notes

1

How texts mean: reading as critical/political practice

1
See Giles, 1987, for an application of some of Lukács' ideas on the novel to D.H. Lawrence's St Mawr.
2
See also Rorty, 1979, where he centres interaction/conversation in a philosophy of language.
3
For a feminist reading of A Scots Quair, the trilogy by Lewis Grassic Gibbons, see Burton, 1984.
4
For a fascinating interface of feminist criticism and biblical studies see Collins, 1985; Russell, 1985; Kaiser, 1987.
5
For a study of women's language in prophecy and testimony in pentecostal services in Southern Indiana see Lawless, 1983, and for a similar analysis of masculine language/style see Schwenger, 1984; Sedgwick, 1985.
6
See, for example, Rosenfeld, 1984, for a discussion of the innovative language and style of French writer Monique Wittig.
7
Cf. Selden, 1985:66.7, for a similar, though less formal, experiment.
8
Cf. Irving Massey, who argues that contemporary linguistics is too concerned, not innocent enough, and 'condemned to perpetual responsibility' (Massey, 1970:97).
9
Cf. the discussion in St Clair, 1978:50, where he talks about cultural pluralism reducing abuses against minorities, and 1978:53f on the language of oppression; see also St Clair, 1982, for similar issues.
10
See Guback, 1967, for an analysis of the various ways in which a speech by John F. Kennedy was treated on a number of radio and television stations; see also Medhurst, 1987, for a similar analysis of a speech by Dwight D. Eisenhower; see also Moss, 1985, on the rhetoric of defence in the US; Richardson, 1985, on speeches against the peace movement in the UK, and the various papers in Chilton, 1985.
11
For work on the language/discourse of schizophrenics see Rochester and Martin, 1979.
12
For work developing this sort of analysis of newspaper discourse see Hartley and Montgomery, 1985; Cohen and Young, 1973; Ellis, 1982; Hartley, 1982; Trew, 1979; Hodge, 1979.

-170-

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Language, Literature, and Critical Practice: Ways of Analysing Text
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Series Editor's Introduction to the Interface Series xi
  • Foreword xv
  • Acknowledgements xvi
  • Text Analyses xvii
  • Preface 1
  • 1 - How Texts Mean: Reading as Critical/Political Practice 5
  • 2 - Language, Literature and Scientific Fictions 45
  • 3 - Reading Literary Texts: Traditions, Assumptions, Practices 57
  • 4 - Reading Texts Closely: Language, Style and the 'Buried Life of Words' 88
  • 5 - The Linguistics of Text: Structures and Strictures 117
  • Afterword 167
  • Notes 170
  • Bibliography 176
  • Index 207
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