A Dictionary of Phonetics and Phonology

By R. L. Trask | Go to book overview

Preface

This dictionary is intended primarily for students and teachers of phonetics and linguistics. Like its companion volume, A Dictionary of Grammatical Terms in Linguistics, this dictionary focuses on just one major area of the linguistic sciences and tries to provide detailed coverage of that area.

Of course, it is not possible to include every single one of the many thousands of terms which make an appearance somewhere in the phonological literature, but the nearly 2,000 terms which are defined here should include virtually every term you are likely to encounter outside the most specialized monographs.

The larger part of the dictionary is devoted to terms which have been in existence for some time and which look likely to remain in use for the foreseeable future: alternation, apical, contour tone, creaky voice, obstruent, rule loss, sandhi, vowel harmony.

Though articulatory phonetics naturally features very prominently in these pages, acoustic and perceptual phonetics are not neglected, nor is general speech science: Action Theory, acoustic filter, cochlea, duplex perception, electromyography, formant, quantal vowel, transition.

The terminology of classical phonology is well covered, including the terms used by the Prague School, by Daniel Jones and by the American Structuralists: archiphoneme, biuniqueness, diaphone, EPD, juncture phoneme, privative opposition.

Classical generative phonology is abundantly covered: absolute neutralization, exchange rule, Halle's argument, systematic phoneme. Among more recent developments, Autosegmental Phonology and Metrical Phonology are treated in particular detail: demibeat, deforestation, dumping, iambic reversal, No-Crossing Constraint, timing tier. But the principal terms from nearly all the major developments in phonology in the last two decades are also defined: coronal underspecification, Derived Environment Constraint, feature geometry, hot feature, Prosodic Hierarchy, subjunction, via rule.

Distinctive features are covered in great detail. Summaries of some half-dozen feature systems are given, and many dozens of individual features are defined.

-vii-

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A Dictionary of Phonetics and Phonology
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures vi
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Abbreviations xi
  • Guide to Pronunciation xii
  • A Dictionary of Phonetics and Phonology xiii
  • A 1
  • B 46
  • C 62
  • D 101
  • E 126
  • F 139
  • G 154
  • H 165
  • I 175
  • J 188
  • K 191
  • L 193
  • M 214
  • N 232
  • O 245
  • P 254
  • Q 298
  • R 299
  • S 316
  • T 350
  • U 365
  • V 371
  • W 385
  • X 391
  • Y 392
  • Z 393
  • Appendix: the International Phonetic Alphabet (Revised to 1993) 394
  • References 395
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