A Dictionary of Phonetics and Phonology

By R. L. Trask | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

I should like to thank Julia Hall, Emma Cotter, Alison Foyle and Caroline Cautley of Routledge for encouraging this book and for putting up with several exasperating delays along the way. To Dick Hudson I am indebted for getting me into the linguistic lexicography business in the first place. Two anonymous readers, and later Richard Coates, John Goldsmith and most especially Max Wheeler, read and commented on early drafts of varying sizes; I am grateful to all of them, and I have managed to incorporate most of their comments into the final version. I regret that Goldsmith's 1995 book appeared too late to be taken into account in preparing the dictionary; this book contains useful further reading on many of the entries in the dictionary. I am further indebted to Kasia Jaszczołh for making available to me a body of unpublished work in Optimality Theory. And, as always, I am deeply grateful to Jenny Potts for an impeccable job of copy-editing.

Naturally, I owe an enormous debt to all my fellow linguists, past and present, whose works I have combed for terms and definitions. Among those phoneticians and linguists of whose work I have made particularly heavy use are David Abercrombie, John Anderson, Stephen Anderson, Sheila Blumstein, Philip Carr, J.C. Catford, Noam Chomsky, John Clark, Alan Cruttenden, David Crystal, Peter Denes, Jacques Durand, Eli Fischer-Jørgensen, Victoria Fromkin, D.B. Fry, Hans Giegerich, A.C. Gimson, John Goldsmith, Morris Halle, Richard Hogg, Larry Hyman, Daniel Jones, Francis Katamba, Michael Kenstowicz, William Labov, Peter Ladefoged, Roger Lass, John Laver, Philip Lieberman, C.B. McCully, Elliot Pinson, Peter Roach, Iggy Roca, Alan Sommerstein, John Wells and Colin Yallop - though these names certainly do not exhaust the sources I consulted.

Needless to say, none of these people bears any responsibility for any shortcomings the dictionary may prove to have.

The author and publisher would like to thank the following for permission to reprint copyright material: Figure A1: from D.B. Fry (1979) The Physics of Speech, p. 56 and p. 77, by permission of Cambridge University Press; Figure C1 and Figure P1: from J.C. Catford (1977) Fundamental Problems in Phonetics, p. 143, p. 145

-ix-

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A Dictionary of Phonetics and Phonology
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures vi
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Abbreviations xi
  • Guide to Pronunciation xii
  • A Dictionary of Phonetics and Phonology xiii
  • A 1
  • B 46
  • C 62
  • D 101
  • E 126
  • F 139
  • G 154
  • H 165
  • I 175
  • J 188
  • K 191
  • L 193
  • M 214
  • N 232
  • O 245
  • P 254
  • Q 298
  • R 299
  • S 316
  • T 350
  • U 365
  • V 371
  • W 385
  • X 391
  • Y 392
  • Z 393
  • Appendix: the International Phonetic Alphabet (Revised to 1993) 394
  • References 395
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