Medieval England: A Social History and Archaeology from the Conquest to 1600 A.D

By Colin Platt | Go to book overview

Preface to the 1994 Edition

In 1978, when this book was first published, medieval archaeology was still a young discipline. It had been well-funded in the 1970s, when new data had accumulated very fast. But such had been the pressure of redevelopment in that decade that field archaeology was almost entirely rescue-led, allowing little opportunity for research. Notable exceptions included Martin Biddle's excavations at Winchester, Barry Cunliffe's at Portchester, Phil Barker's at Hen Domen, and the long-running investigation of the deserted village of Wharram Percy, directed by John Hurst and Maurice Beresford. But the great bulk of government funding was for a reactive archaeology, moving from one threatened site to the next.

Rescue archaeology was outstandingly successful, bringing unprecedented growth to the profession. However, that success had its down-side also in a growing back-log of unpublished excavations, and in the distancing of many field-workers from research. Some of those excavations remain unpublished even now, and the book I wrote in 1978 preserves the only printed record of their results. But medieval archaeology has moved on since that time. And what has kept my book in print is less its review of otherwise lost material than the historical context it still provides for all such work.

For more recent archaeological reviews, readers may now turn to John Kenyon (on fortifications) and Patrick Greene (on monasteries). Updating general surveys, supplementing my own, have been published by Helen Clarke (1984), John Steane (1985) and David Hinton (1990). Major site reports, unavailable when I wrote, have since appeared from York, Winchester and London, Northampton and Norwich, Carlisle and Castle Acre, Bordesley and Norton, Goltho, Wharram Percy and Raunds. This list could be extended many times and is still growing. But all this activity has yet to result in a fresh evaluation of history's place in medieval archaeology and vice versa. In the meantime, historians too have moved fast. In just one area of mutual interest-the late-medieval parish and its church-there have been important recent contributions by Eamon Duffy and Robert Whiting, Clive Burgess and Gervase Rosser, John Thomson, Peter

-xvii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Medieval England: A Social History and Archaeology from the Conquest to 1600 A.D
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Preface and Acknowledgments xiii
  • Preface to the 1994 Edition xvii
  • 1 - The Anglo-Norman Settlement 1
  • 2 - Economic Growth 30
  • 3 - Set-Back 91
  • 4 - After the Black Death 126
  • 5 - Stability at a Reduced Level: the Church 138
  • 6 - Conspicuous Waste 173
  • 7 - Reorientation Under the Tudors 205
  • Abbreviations 251
  • Notes and References 252
  • Index 284
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 294

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.